13 Dead, Including Gunman, In DC Navy Yard Shooting Rampage - New York News

13 Dead, Including Gunman, In DC Navy Yard Shooting Rampage

Posted: Updated:
WASHINGTON -

Authorities now say a lone gunman opened fire in the Washington Navy Yard, and the shooting rampage left 13 people dead, including himself.

This morning, we are learning more about the victims.

Mayor Vincent Gray says 12 of the victims range in age from 46- to 73-years-old.

Police have released the identities of seven victims, so far. They are all civilians: Michael Arnold, 59; Sylvia Frasier, 53; Kathy Gaarde, 62; John Roger Johnson, 73; Frank Kohler, 50; Bernard Proctor, 46; and Vishnu Pandit, 61.

The gunman, identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, was also killed in a gunfight with police.

Alexis, a former Naval Reservist aviation electrician, was discharged in 2011.

Gray said late Monday night that officials were still notifying the families of about half of the people who were killed.

The attack began at 8:20 a.m. Monday inside a building at the heavily-secured Washington Navy Yard.

Police say Alexis fired from a balcony onto office workers in an atrium below.

The FBI says Alexis used a valid pass to get on to the Navy Yard, and he was carrying three weapons.

Federal officials say he had an AR-15 assault rifle, a shotgun and a handgun that he took from a police officer at the scene.

Alexis is a former Navy Reservist who has a history of run-ins with police following shootings in Texas and Seattle.

His father once told detectives his son had anger management problems related to post-traumatic stress disorder brought on by the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

Alexis, once lived in Brooklyn, N.Y. On Monday night, police searched that home. There's no word on what investigators may have been looking for. But Alexis may still have family in the area.

Neighbors said they never would have expected any trouble.

Alexis' motive for the shooting rampage is not clear.

President Barack Obama was briefed about the shooting almost immediately after it happened.

Speaking before an economic event, the president said, "The men and women working at the Navy Yard should never have experienced the horror they faced at work. These are men and women who were going to work doing their job protecting all of us. They're patriots."

Flags at the White House are at half staff in honor of the victims gunned down just 4 miles away.

As the day long drama unfolded, it was a scene of panic and chaos as police, with guns drawn, rushed to find a gunman. Emergency personnel were airlifting victims to area hospitals.

Hundreds of civilian and military employees poured out of the Navy Yard after hiding in their offices for hours.

"I'm just glad to go home. I'm grateful I wasn't injured. I'm concerned because my boss is inside," said Freedom Mushaw, a Naval analyst.

Caravans of buses were escorting employees off the navy yard property into the night. But just how a gunman gets into one of the oldest military installations in the country is the big question tonight.

Workers said you can't get into the building unless you have a badge to use, FOX 29'S Chris O'Connell reported from Washington.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Startups flock to NY TechDay

    Startups flock to NY TechDay

    Thursday, April 24 2014 6:40 PM EDT2014-04-24 22:40:26 GMT
    NY TechDay is where the hottest new startups come every year. More than 400 of them from all different countries come to check out the NYC tech scene. Our first stop at Pier 92 was Rent Hackr, a website with renter generated data to help apartment hunters. Then we checked out Karma, a portable Wi-Fi device that lets you share hot spots with friends.
    NY TechDay is where the hottest new startups come every year. More than 400 of them from all different countries come to check out the NYC tech scene. Our first stop at Pier 92 was Rent Hackr, a website with renter generated data to help apartment hunters. Then we checked out Karma, a portable Wi-Fi device that lets you share hot spots with friends.
  • PETA protests Central Park horse-drawn carriages

    PETA protests Central Park horse-drawn carriages

    Thursday, April 24 2014 6:08 PM EDT2014-04-24 22:08:12 GMT
    Chanting the mayor's name in appreciation, some 50 demonstrators protested horse-drawn carriages in the city on Thursday. The protest was organized by PETA and NYCLASS after a horse fell on the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street Wednesday. The protestors said the horse was spooked by a bus and cited witness accounts who shot some video. The horse that fell is 15-year-old Spartacus.
    Chanting the mayor's name in appreciation, some 50 demonstrators protested horse-drawn carriages in the city on Thursday. The protest was organized by PETA and NYCLASS after a horse fell on the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street Wednesday. The protestors said the horse was spooked by a bus and cited witness accounts who shot some video. The horse that fell is 15-year-old Spartacus.
  • Superstorm Sandy

    NYU Langone unveils rebuilt emergency room

    NYU Langone unveils rebuilt emergency room

    Thursday, April 24 2014 5:54 PM EDT2014-04-24 21:54:40 GMT
    A year and a half after Superstorm Sandy hit New York, a major city emergency facility that was destroyed finally fully reopened Thursday — with waterproof walls. Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined Mayor Bill de Blasio and other dignitaries to celebrate the emergency complex at the NYU Langone Medical Center, which is now triple the size of the old one and equipped with the latest technology.
    A year and a half after Superstorm Sandy hit New York, a major city emergency facility that was destroyed finally fully reopened Thursday — with waterproof walls. Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined Mayor Bill de Blasio and other dignitaries to celebrate the emergency complex at the NYU Langone Medical Center, which is now triple the size of the old one and equipped with the latest technology.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices