FERAL CATS: Minneapolis considers sterilization ordinance - New York News

  • Do you support the trap-neuter-return plan coming before the Minneapolis City Council?

  • Thank you for participating in our poll. Here are the results so far:

    Yes.
    89%
    89 votes
    No.
    11%
    11 votes

FERAL CATS: Minneapolis considers sterilization ordinance

Posted: Updated:
Nicholas | Animal Control Pet of the Week | Animal ID#:  A271961/ FA01 Nicholas | Animal Control Pet of the Week | Animal ID#: A271961/ FA01
MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) -

The claws came out at Minneapolis City Hall on Wednesday as leaders considered an ordinance to reduce the number of feral cats by trapping them and then releasing them once they've been spayed or neutered.

There's a rented room at Minneapolis Animal Control where a non-profit called MN-SNAP sterilizes dogs and cats at a low cost four days a week.

"Our purpose is to provide affordable and accessible spay-neuter services to people who can't afford it," Dr. Kim Culbertson explained.

One on five of the cats that come in are feral, and the non-profit contends spaying or neutering them is a far better way to reduce the city's population of strays than Animal Control's current approach, which is to trap and euthanize.

"Over the past five years, Minneapolis Animal Care and Control has spent around $200,000 trapping and killing cats, and it's not a method that's working to reduce the feral cat and stray cat population," Culbertson said.

Before a Minneapolis City Council committee, representatives of the Animal Control said they agree that trapping and then releasing feral cats after they've been neutered or spayed would be better.

The plan, called trap-neuter-return, is already in place in seven other cities across the country, including in St. Paul. It works by allowing people to register as caretakers of feral cat colonies to make sure they're vaccinated, chipped and sterilized.

Animal advocates love the plan, saying it's not only kinder, but it also drastically reduces populations -- except for bird lovers. They worry that if feral cats are cared for and fed, they will grow in numbers. Others still wonder how the caretakers will fare.

"If this ordinance is passed, these cats will put a huge burden on the caretakers," Jerry Bahls, president of the Audubon Chapter, argued.

Yet, one man said he went from 104 cats down to four in just two years after the feral cat colony in his neighborhood was spayed and neutered.

Online resource:

Join our Facebook family

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • NJ brush fire forces evacuations

    NJ brush fire forces evacuations

    Thursday, April 24 2014 2:02 PM EDT2014-04-24 18:02:58 GMT
    A New Jersey school and several homes were evacuated Thursday afternoon because of a large brush fire that was being fanned by winds.Beachwood Intermediate South School was closed just after 12:30 p.m. Parents were told not to report to the school. The Ocean County Sheriff's Dept. said that all children were going to be safely evacuated to another location.
    A New Jersey school and several homes were evacuated Thursday afternoon because of a large brush fire that was being fanned by winds.Beachwood Intermediate South School was closed just after 12:30 p.m. Parents were told not to report to the school. The Ocean County Sheriff's Dept. said that all children were going to be safely evacuated to another location.
  • Cops swarm home after disgruntled Call of Duty gamer calls in swatting hoax

    Cops swarm home after disgruntled Call of Duty gamer calls in swatting hoax

    Thursday, April 24 2014 12:05 PM EDT2014-04-24 16:05:27 GMT
    Heavily armed police officers descended on a home in Long Beach, Long Island thinking they might find a grisly murder scene. Instead they found a terrified woman who had no clue what they were talking about and her teenaged son playing video games.
    Heavily armed police officers descended on a home in Long Beach, Long Island thinking they might find a grisly murder scene. Instead they found a terrified woman who had no clue what they were talking about and her teenaged son playing video games.
  • Girl fights to bring 22-year-old prom date

    Girl fights to bring 22-year-old prom date

    Thursday, April 24 2014 11:50 AM EDT2014-04-24 15:50:19 GMT
    A Connecticut teenager is appealing to her local Board of Education after school officials rejected her request to bring her 21-year-old boyfriend to her prom.
    A Connecticut teenager is appealing to her local Board of Education after school officials rejected her request to bring her 21-year-old boyfriend to her prom.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices