Even after war ends, who will care for Syria’s 2 million refugees? - New York News

Even after war ends, who will care for Syria’s 2 million refugees?

Updated:

By: Jamshid Ghazi Askar, Deseret News

As Congress mulls over whether to green-light U.S. military intervention in Syria's civil war, a growing number of media outlets are shining a light on the plight of the displaced Syrians who have fled their homes for fear of their lives.

“The stream of refugees continues to flow across Syria's borders,” a Deseret News staff editorial reported Wednesday. “U.S. allies such as Turkey and Iraq are being impacted by this stream, which the United Nations now says equals 2 million Syrians living outside their own country.”

A front-page article in Wednesday's Wall Street Journal profiled life at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, where 130,000 Syrians have taken up residence.

“Zaatari now ranks as Jordan's fourth-largest city, the United Nations says, and as the second-largest refugee camp in the world,” Nour Malas wrote for the Journal. “ … At least 30,000 kiosks form a bustling mini-economy run (by) Syrian refugees. Between butchers and grocers, there are signs that residents don't see themselves leaving anytime soon: a ladies' salon, a costume store, a wedding-gown shop. …

“It is a scene playing out across the Middle East. In Lebanon and Iraq, Turkey and Egypt, Syria's refugee exodus has stretched resources, sparked political and sectarian tensions, and changed economies and demographics.”

On Tuesday, the Christian Science Monitor also produced a feature-length piece about the challenges of life in Zaatari.

The Monitor's Christa Case Bryant wrote, “Jeff Silverman of (international aid group) Oxfam has a long history of working in refugee camps, from South Sudan to Darfur to Liberia. But he says Zaatari is the most challenging camp he's ever worked in - and many of his colleagues agree.

“It's a unique mix of cultural and logistical challenges, with an assertive population that is used to a much higher standard of living than your average refugee. ‘There's no communal sense like you see in Africa,' says Mr. Silverman. ‘Here it's just everyone for themselves.' ”

As illustrative as those two articles are, the defining piece about Zaatari likely remains “City of the Lost” - the exquisite article David Remnick filed last week for the New Yorker.

"In Zaatari, the dispossession is absolute," Remnick reported. "Everyone has lost his country, his home, his equilibrium. Most have lost a family member or a close friend to the war. What is left is a kind of theatrical pride, the necessary performance of will. ‘This place is a graveyard for camels,’ a refugee in his thirties named Ahmed Bakar told me one morning. ‘Camels can’t even live here. But Syrians can.’ "


Original Post

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Terror threats at chemical plants underestimated

    Terror threats at chemical plants underestimated

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 9:08 AM EDT2014-07-30 13:08:58 GMT
    Congressional investigators say the government is underestimating the threat of a chemical attack on America's densely populated cities and has failed to inspect virtually all of the chemical facilities that it...
    Congressional investigators say the government is underestimating the threat of a chemical attack on America's densely populated cities and has failed to inspect virtually all of the chemical facilities that it...
  • Teen in elevator attacked and robbed

    Teen in elevator attacked and robbed

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 8:31 AM EDT2014-07-30 12:31:54 GMT
    Two thugs were caught on security camera footage beating a teenager and stealing from her inside an apartment building in the Midwood section of Brooklyn.  The NYPD says the attackers are seen dragging the 18-year-old out of an elevator into the hallway and punching and kicking her.
    Two thugs were caught on security camera footage beating a teenager and stealing from her inside an apartment building in the Midwood section of Brooklyn.  The NYPD says the attackers are seen dragging the 18-year-old out of an elevator into the hallway and punching and kicking her.
  • TSA contest calls for ideas to improve airline security lines

    TSA contest calls for ideas to improve airline security lines

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 8:11 AM EDT2014-07-30 12:11:07 GMT
    Everyone hates long lines at security checkpoints and the TSA knows it. Now the TSA is sponsoring a contest to encourage anyone with new ideas about how to make the airport security lines go faster. Often for air travelers, the security checkpoint experience is the worst part of their trip. That's why the TSA turned to the crowdsourcing site Innocentive asking for ideas pledging a total of $15,000 in prize money, with at least one $5,000 award.
    Everyone hates long lines at security checkpoints and the TSA knows it. Now the TSA is sponsoring a contest to encourage anyone with new ideas about how to make the airport security lines go faster. Often for air travelers, the security checkpoint experience is the worst part of their trip. That's why the TSA turned to the crowdsourcing site Innocentive asking for ideas pledging a total of $15,000 in prize money, with at least one $5,000 award.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices