Local Syrian-Americans Worried About Crisis In Syria - New York News

Local Syrian-Americans Worried About Crisis In Syria

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ALLENTOWN, Pa. -

Allentown is home to a number of Syrian-American residents. As things progress in Washington, the fear grows among the residents.

"I haven't stopped worrying; my family hasn't stopped worrying," says Hope Sabbagh. "We're very scared."

They show us pictures of the faces of loved ones that they worry about every day, all Syrian residents whom they fear could be in danger.

"Direct family members, a kid 8-10 years old. He is there now, waiting to be killed," says Pastor Moufid Khoury.

"They're very afraid; some people can't leave homes, their basements, to go get a loaf of bread. It's not right to be living in a life of fear," says Sabbagh.

20 year old Hope Sabbagh lives in Lehigh valley, home to more than 15,000 people of Syrian descent. She's been following the developments in Washington, D.C. very closely.

"What is our reason to go over there? It's been two years. And they still haven't contemplated whether to go or not. What are they still contemplating? What is their mission? What is America going to get out of it?" she asks.

Today, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted in favor of authorizing military action in Syria. Those who support taking military action say it's necessary to punish president Assad for allegedly using chemical weapons. However US Congressman Charlie Dent opposes the decision and says he worries about the consequences.

"The consequences could be significant not only to the us, but to our friends and allies. I do not think this is well thought out," says Congressman Dent. "Over 100,000 Syrians killed in civil war, how will a limited strike do anything to topple Assad?"

Each step toward US involvement is more agonizing for Sabbagh and others in the Syrian community.

"We want the Syrian people to solve the conflict with their own hands," says Aziz Wehbay of the Syrian American Society.

"We have families there. We have people that are innocent," says Pastor Khoury.

There have been a number of rallies and protests in Allentown. More protests are planned next week.

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