Phoenix residents divided over U.S. response to Syria - New York News

Phoenix residents divided over U.S. response to Syria

Posted: Updated:
TEMPE, Ariz. -

Saturday, President Obama asked Congress to decide whether the U.S. should attack the government of Syria in the wake of a poison gas attack on a Damascus neighborhood that killed more than 1,400 people.

The debate played out on the streets of Phoenix as well.

The reaction is intense on both sides of the issue. Some fear another conflict for the U.S. in the Middle East -- but others say atrocities like the chemical warfare attack are just too much and the United States has to send the Syrian government a military message.

"No more war! No more war!" chanted demonstrators in Tempe Saturday night.

But while some marched against a U.S. attack on Syria, others said now is the time to act.

"Two years of killing. You did nothing. You did not stop the killers!" shouted one man.

Sunday, it's all quiet on Mill Ave. But what to do at this point in the civil war in Syria is still a question with no clear answer. Some say the U.S. must get involved.

"I was listening to Obama… I agree, I mean it is genocide it is not acceptable," said Dawn and Michael Snow.

But others have reservations about a U.S. attack.

"I just feel that it is unfortunate and my heart goes out to people and we have the ability to help them, but I don't know why we are always the ones everybody looks to. Because I think there are other countries that have money and are financially fit as well," said Kristen Kemp.

And what about the interests of America's ally, next door to war-torn Syria? Israel's security is on Rabbi Meendy Deitsch's mind with the Jewish New Year approaching.

"But the point is to show our friends we are here for one another, we must make that point clear, we are here for you. You are not alone and we will stand beside you," said Rabbi Meendy Deitsch Chabad, Pollack Center for Jewish Life.

The debate over whether the United States should attack Syria will only intensify in the coming days.

Didn't find what
you were looking for?

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 10:05 PM EDT2014-09-17 02:05:20 GMT
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
  • Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 8:43 PM EDT2014-09-17 00:43:17 GMT
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
  • High-fiving strangers in NYC

    High-fiving strangers in NYC

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:01 PM EDT2014-09-16 22:01:29 GMT
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices