Historic Tampa home holds hidden secret - New York News

Historic Tampa home holds hidden secret

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TEMPLE TERRACE (FOX 13) -

Anyone who has owned an older home will tell you they are full of surprises.

Often they're headaches in the form of faulty wiring or plumbing. But a project to restore a 1922 estate in Temple Terrace revealed a hidden piece of local history -- a hand-drawn blueprint created by a prolific local architect.

"It was between two rafters," explained David Bulluck, who now owns the home. "It had been tucked away up there for probably 30 years."

If there was any doubt about how to put the old house back together, the blueprint erases it. With precise measure, it shows virtually every part of the house, and how it was originally constructed.

"These are the plans for the fireplace that's still up in the main house," said Bulluck, as he pointed to a section of the paper which was weathered but still in surprisingly good condition.

At the corner of the blueprint is the embossed seal of architect M. Leo Elliott, who designed countless homes and other buildings around Tampa and in other towns and cities for miles around.

He died in 1967. Among his designs was Tampa's Old City Hall and the Centro Asturiano social club.

Elliott also designed the original Temple Terrace golf course estates of the early 1920's. They were the jewels of one of America's first golf course communities. Only a handful of the homes remain.

But as far as he knows, Bulluck's house is the only one that's complete with its original architectural blueprints.

He says he may display a copy of it in Temple Terrace City Hall, where historic preservation and restoration is a popular topic.

Once restoration is completed, he plans to use the house as a law office.

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