With Seniority Suspended, Parents And Teachers Not Happy - New York News

With Seniority Suspended, Parents And Teachers Not Happy

Posted: Updated:
PHILADELPHIA -

A unanimous vote by the School Reform Commission sent a packed room of parents, teachers and community members into an uproar.

In a move to get schools open and running for September 9th, the board voted to suspend certain school codes. The most controversial decision deals with how staff is hired and placed. The plan will bring back about 1000 of the more than 3000 staff laid off. But who is brought back won't be based on seniority, but instead, on the need and the best fit.

"To use those staff who are familiar with students, the schools in their communities," says Superintendent William Hite. "It wasn't about trying to wholesale change or attack some provision in the contract; it was really about how do we manage the fewer staff that we have,"

Parents worry that their children's safety and education are being compromised because not every school will be fully staffed.

"No one in their right mind would open schools without the adequate number of school aides, without a guidance counselor for every child, without nurses," says Helen Gym, a parent. "You talk about a war on education, and you fire on the soldiers who are going to do it for you."

Teachers are angry about losing seniority and forfeiting pay increases.

"Destroying teacher seniority is removing the professional educators who have experience and shown years and years of dedication to a school district. That blames us for every possible problem," says Gail Kantor, a teacher.

Retired teacher and parent Diane Kayne agrees.

"You want to eliminate step increases for teachers. Is this good for children when you constantly make Philadelphia a second and third class place to work?"

Superintendent Hite says the changes are only to manage through the opening of school under the current situation, not to define new school practices.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 10:05 PM EDT2014-09-17 02:05:20 GMT
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
  • Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Bratton: Islamic State group threat expanding

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 8:43 PM EDT2014-09-17 00:43:17 GMT
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
  • High-fiving strangers in NYC

    High-fiving strangers in NYC

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:01 PM EDT2014-09-16 22:01:29 GMT
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices