With Seniority Suspended, Parents And Teachers Not Happy - New York News

With Seniority Suspended, Parents And Teachers Not Happy

Posted: Updated:
PHILADELPHIA -

A unanimous vote by the School Reform Commission sent a packed room of parents, teachers and community members into an uproar.

In a move to get schools open and running for September 9th, the board voted to suspend certain school codes. The most controversial decision deals with how staff is hired and placed. The plan will bring back about 1000 of the more than 3000 staff laid off. But who is brought back won't be based on seniority, but instead, on the need and the best fit.

"To use those staff who are familiar with students, the schools in their communities," says Superintendent William Hite. "It wasn't about trying to wholesale change or attack some provision in the contract; it was really about how do we manage the fewer staff that we have,"

Parents worry that their children's safety and education are being compromised because not every school will be fully staffed.

"No one in their right mind would open schools without the adequate number of school aides, without a guidance counselor for every child, without nurses," says Helen Gym, a parent. "You talk about a war on education, and you fire on the soldiers who are going to do it for you."

Teachers are angry about losing seniority and forfeiting pay increases.

"Destroying teacher seniority is removing the professional educators who have experience and shown years and years of dedication to a school district. That blames us for every possible problem," says Gail Kantor, a teacher.

Retired teacher and parent Diane Kayne agrees.

"You want to eliminate step increases for teachers. Is this good for children when you constantly make Philadelphia a second and third class place to work?"

Superintendent Hite says the changes are only to manage through the opening of school under the current situation, not to define new school practices.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices