Police kill La. bank hostage taker; 1 hostage dies - New York News

Police kill La. bank hostage taker; 1 hostage dies

Posted: Updated:

By HOLBROOK MOHR
Associated Press

ST. JOSEPH, La. (AP) - A man who took hostages at a bank in rural Louisiana shot the two remaining hostages, killing one of them, before being shot and killed by police, authorities said.

During negotiations with law enforcement late Tuesday, the suspect - identified as 20-year-old Fuaed (FOO-od) Abdo Ahmed - said he was going to kill the hostages, Louisiana State Police superintendent Col. Mike Edmonson said. State police then entered the building just before midnight Tuesday.

That's when Ahmed shot the two hostages and then state police shot and killed him, Edmonson said. Edmonson said the hostages were shot in the upper body. He did not have any other information on the condition of the second hostage who was shot.

The hostages were both shot with a handgun, but Edmonson said Ahmed was also armed with a rifle.

The gunman initially took two women and a man captive around 12:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Tensas State Bank branch in St. Joseph. He later released one of the female hostages.

Edmonson said authorities were able to put Ahmed on the phone with a friend in Alaska during negotiations and that was key in getting him to release the hostage. But Edmonson also said the man grew increasingly erratic as negotiations went on, sometimes hanging up on police.

Edmonson said Ahmed was a paranoid schizophrenic who believed a device had been implanted in his brain and said the standoff was not a bank robbery attempt but a planned attack. Ahmed had written a letter "detailing exactly what he was going to do," Edmonson said.

"He was mad at people that he said were mean to him," he said. "He had voices in his head."

But Edmonson said there was no indication Ahmed had any history with the bank employees and authorities did not know why he picked the bank. The bank sits across the street from a service station owned by Ahmed's family.

"These were good, God-fearing people," he said of the hostages.

The suspect also had a duffel bag containing items he was going to torture the hostages with, Edmonson said.

"His intent was to inflict pain and kill these individuals," he said.

Edmonson said Ahmed's parents were from Yemen, but he was a U.S. citizen and there was no indication that he had a political or religious motive.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Lawsuit settlements reached in Metro-North crash

    Lawsuit settlements reached in Metro-North crash

    Monday, September 15 2014 8:39 PM EDT2014-09-16 00:39:39 GMT
    Four of 28 people who sued the Metro-North Railroad in federal court after being injured in a Bridgeport train crash last year have settled with the commuter railroad.
    Four of 28 people who sued the Metro-North Railroad in federal court after being injured in a train crash in Connecticut last year have settled with the commuter railroad.
  • A history classroom in the real world

    A history classroom in the real world

    Monday, September 15 2014 7:09 PM EDT2014-09-15 23:09:49 GMT
    When Denis Belliveau is teaching kids about Marco Polo, he is in his element. He makes the explorer's journey come alive by taking students on a No. 7 train ride through Queens, New York's most diverse borough. He brings history alive for his students. Along the way the students stop in neighborhoods that mirror Polo's trip. I caught up with the class in Flushing, Queens, which easily resembles China.
    When Denis Belliveau is teaching kids about Marco Polo, he is in his element. He makes the explorer's journey come alive by taking students on a No. 7 train ride through Queens, New York's most diverse borough. He brings history alive for his students. Along the way the students stop in neighborhoods that mirror Polo's trip. I caught up with the class in Flushing, Queens, which easily resembles China.
  • Etan Patz murder confession played in court

    Etan Patz murder confession played in court

    Monday, September 15 2014 6:43 PM EDT2014-09-15 22:43:37 GMT
    A judge allowed a confession tape to be played in court in connection with the case of Etan Patz, who vanished in 1979. On the tape, Pedro Hernandez described how he killed Patz. But his lawyers say Hernandez falsely confessed and doesn't understand his rights. Before Hernandez's videotaped confession was played, Patz's mother quickly left the courtroom unable to watch the video.
    A judge allowed a confession tape to be played in court in connection with the case of Etan Patz, who vanished in 1979. On the tape, Pedro Hernandez described how he killed Patz. But his lawyers say Hernandez falsely confessed and doesn't understand his rights. Before Hernandez's videotaped confession was played, Patz's mother quickly left the courtroom unable to watch the video.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices