No butts about it: ASU campuses go smoke-free - New York News

No butts about it: ASU campuses go smoke-free

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TEMPE, Ariz. -

You can't light up anymore on Arizona State University campuses -- a smoking ban has now gone into effect.  So what do ASU students think about the new rule?

Last week, all ASU students received an e-mail giving them a heads up about the new policy.  On Thursday, it went into effect and all campuses are tobacco free.

"I think it's great. Cigarette smoke needs to be moved out of society.  It smells bad, it's bad for people's lungs --  not only the smokers, but the people that are exposed to it and people will hopefully be encouraged to smoke less because of the ban," said Sonia Hickman.

Hickman shared her excitement for the tobacco free policy after signs went up around campus, but Melissa Ellingbond, who didn't want to show her face on camera, opposes the plan.

"I think it's dumb because there's certain places at ASU you can smoke with no one around."

Before the ban, students could smoke as long as they were 25 feet from building entrances.  Now they can't even smoke in their own vehicles on the property. The university is taking a "community enforcement" approach, which means students are asked to tell smokers to put out their cigarettes.

The university even posted a video on Vimeo to help students approach people who don't know about the policy.

"I think that's probably how it will work is people will think someone might come up to them so they'll avoid smoking around here for example," said Hickman.

Ellingbond says no way.

"Yeah dude, no I'm still gonna smoke.  It's not really gonna change anything.  It's student enforced, not cops enforced.  Ain't nobody got time for that, sorry."

This smoker who didn't want to give his name says even though officers won't be citing smokers,  public shame is enough to keep to keep him from lighting up and it might even help him quit.

"Well, my most of my time is spent on campus, I suppose it would have an impact."

ASU says the policy is part of a community wide effort to promote health and wellness for all ASU students in Tempe.

Visit students.asu.edu/tobacco-free for maps of smoke-free zones on all four campuses. 

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