South site for Falcons stadium deemed unfeasible - New York News

South site for Falcons stadium deemed unfeasible

ATLANTA -

The Atlanta Falcons told government officials on Tuesday that the preferred south site for the new football stadium is not feasible for development.

An agreement earlier this year established a site just south of the Georgia Dome as the preferred location for the new billion dollar stadium, but deals to buy two churches at that site were never finalized.

On Tuesday, the Falcons told government officials that the south location is no longer feasible.

The Georgia World Congress Center Authority Board voted to allow the Falcons to start soil testing and other feasibility studies on the alternative site at the corner of Northside Drive and Ivan Allen Jr. Boulevard, which is across from the World Congress Center complex.

"We going to turn attention to the north side and start working through the feasibility analysis of the north," said GWCCA Executive Director Frank Poe. "Basically, the Falcons have indicated at this time the south side is not feasible. Property has not been acquired."

After the board vote, the chairman of Friendship Baptist Church told FOX 5's Paul Yates by phone that negotiations with the Falcons and the city of Atlanta were "ongoing and positive."

Mount Vernon Baptist Church did not respond to a request for comment.

The north location has separate challenges, including contaminated soil under a portion of the parking lot and an array of overhead power lines that would have to be removed.

Additionally, a coalition of nearby neighborhoods is strongly opposed to the new site. They urge the Falcons to continue negotiations with the churches.

"The neighborhoods are adamantly against the north site. There is a consensus I'd like to put a positively in favor of the south site," said Mike Koblentz of the Norwest Community Alliance.

The goal is to break ground on the new stadium in 2014.

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