Chromecast: Google’s cheap new way to stream online content onto TV - New York News

Chromecast: Google’s cheap new way to stream online content onto TV

Updated:

By: Jamshid Ghazi Askar, Deseret News

On Wednesday Google announced Chromecast, a new device that wirelessly streams online content from tablets and smartphones onto televisions.

“The box dubs it ‘the easiest way to watch online video on your TV,'” Emily Price wrote for tech website Mashable. “During its press conference, Google demonstrated a wireless device that not only connects to your television while hiding behind it, but also is exceptionally easy to operate.”

Although the Chromecast's features aren't groundbreaking, the $35 price tag could be a game-changer.

“The Chromecast only supports four apps at launch,” CNET reported Wednesday. “That puts it well behind established players like Roku and Apple TV. … However, the big difference is the Chromecast's ultralow $35 price. It's a lot easier to accept those limitations on a $35 device and the low price should also help spread adoption, which in turn should encourage services to include Chromecast at a faster rate.”

Gizmodo's Brian Barrett is so enthusiastic about the new device that his review is headlined, “You'd be crazy not to buy Google Chromecast.”

“It costs $35 to take a flier on what could well be the best streaming solution we've seen yet,” Barrett wrote. “Not only that, but it comes with three months of free Netflix streaming. Three months, even if you're an existing subscriber. That's a $24 value, which means that you're paying 11 bucks for the future of television. Be honest, you've spent more on a sandwich.”

However, Barrett has updated his post to say Google and Netflix have ended that promotion.


Original Post

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

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