Flooded Phoenix apartments suffer extensive damage - New York News

Flooded Phoenix apartments suffer extensive damage

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PHOENIX -

At one valley apartment complex in the area of Indian School and 32nd Street, several units were flooded when the storm hit. And it wasn't just the lower level units.

Even the second story units were flooded -- not from rising water. It was coming into the units from above.

"You could smell mildew."

Robbie Weigold has a tale to share, one echoed by thousands across the valley.

The monsoon hit and damaged his apartment. The water was coming in from every nook and cranny.

"When I came in here the first things I see, water spouting out of the vents. I came in here, water all covered my floor," says Robbie.

"I had water spouting out of this vent, I had water coming out of this vent and this vent as well, I had water pouring, pouring out of this vent."

The water eventually covered his apartment floor. He tried everything but nothing worked.

"As quick as I could I grabbed every single towel in the house and covered the floor in here. I built a dam so the water couldn't get any more into the bedroom."

After about an hour, the water flow finally slowed down. And it wasn't the only on at the complex going through this Sunday. More than 10 units had leaks.

So how did it all that water get in? Workers had been repairing the roof a few days ago, but the work stopped mid-way and the roof may not have been properly covered.

Then came yesterday's storm. The landlord wouldn't comment on the issue -- she told us we needed to speak with the roofer.

The roofer says he was told to stop work while the building owner was out of town.

Meanwhile, tenants just want things repaired and replaced before the next storm moves in.

"I just expect some respect as to what's going and what they're going to do to care of it."

Later Monday night, the roofers were back out there.

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