58 Atlanta schools serve free breakfast, lunch this fall - New York News

58 Atlanta schools serve free breakfast, lunch this fall

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ATLANTA -

Imagine if your child could eat a free breakfast and a free lunch every single day. That's the reality for more than 25,000 students enrolled at Atlanta Public Schools this year.

Fifty-eight of the 100 schools in the APS district qualified for a federal program that will provide students with free meals for the upcoming school year.

That means 25,155 students will eat breakfast, lunch and an after-school snack for free every single day of the school year.

APS pays for the meals up front. The federal government will then reimburse the district. The program is called Community Eligibility Option, or CEO.

Previously, parents who wanted to apply for free or reduced cost lunches had to fill out a slew of paperwork and wait for approval.

If 40 percent or more of the students at a school received free or reduced cost lunches, then the school is eligible to participate in this new federal program.

Georgia is one of 11 states chosen to participate in this pilot program. But, it will be made available nationwide in the 2014-15 school year.

More info:
Community Eligibility Option website
Community Eligibility Option fact sheet
No Kid Hungry: Community Eligibility Option




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