How your body shows signs of stress - New York News

How your body shows signs of stress

Updated:

You might be stressed and not even know it.

There are ways your body reacts to stress that you may not realize.

For example, during a quick nap you have a crazy dream about your coworkers.

Normally, it takes about 90 minutes to enter REM sleep and start dreaming.

If you start dreaming earlier than that, your body is trying to tell you something.

The maximum length of your nap should be around 30 minutes, because once you've hit REM, the nap becomes counterproductive and you'll wake up groggy instead of refreshed.

Another sign of stress is that you forget things. The stress hormone cortisol can effect your memory.

How is your body reacting to exercise? When your usual 45 minute jog makes you feel even worse, it's because moderate exercise can cause cortisol levels to spike even higher.

You may want to take a break from hard workouts and sign up for pilates instead.

You may be stressed if you can drink coffee just before bed or after dinner and still pass right out.

The caffeine is working, but you're not reacting to it because you're super tired.

A sign you probably wouldn't notice: your scalp feels weirdly sensitive when you shampoo.

That's because stress often leads to the release of chemicals in the skin.

It also causes inflammation that can result in break outs.

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