Over-achievers take on medical, law degrees at same time - New York News

Over-achieving students take on medical and law degrees at same time

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TEMPE, Ariz. -

Graduating from medical school is a big deal. And so is getting your law degree. But how about studying to become a lawyer and a doctor at the same time? That's exactly what these students at ASU are doing.

But who are they? And why are they doing this?

Medical school is typically four years. Add law school and you're looking at seven years of schooling. In every law school in the U.S., you'll find a vast law library.

You'll also find students like no other: medical students.

"I applied for medical school first and then I heard about the MD-JD dual degree during my interview for medical school," says Joshua Faucher, law-med student.

Joshua Faucher is one of four students attempting to complete both a medical degree and law degree. If getting 2 degrees at once wasn't challenging enough, they're doing what typically would take seven years in just 6.

It's made possible through a joint program between Mayo Medical School in Minnesota and ASU.

"Was just interested in health policy, but in medical school, we spend so much time learning the science and treatment and diagnosis that we don't have a lot of time to talk about the problems in the American health care system, and what we need to do to fix them," says Faucher.

But don't plan on seeing Faucher in a courtroom. He doesn't plan on taking the bar -- but this future doctor of law and medicine hopes the degrees gives him the tools to dissect the complicated field of medical policy.

"I'm hoping this policy background will help me advocate for insurance reform and patients, that needs to be done."

The students have two years of studying medicine under their belt already. And after they complete their law degree, they'll go back to Mayo Medical School for two years and finish their medical degree there.

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