Crown Point officers shoot, kill two dogs mistaken for coyotes - New York News

Crown Point officers shoot, kill two dogs mistaken for coyotes

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

A Northwest Indiana woman is grieving after her dogs were killed by Crown Point police officers. She says the cops weren't justified, but police tell a different story.

On Thursday evening, Lindsay Schild was consoled by her sister, just one day after Lindsay's two Siberian Huskies were shot to death by Crown Point police.

The dogs had escaped from their yard and were apparently attacking a cat on neighbor's property. The cat's owner called 911 and told police that a pair of coyotes were attacking their pet, which may have led to the responding officer's confusion.

"We know now that they were two dogs, however based on their aggressive nature and physical appearance he thought they were maybe larger sized coyotes," Police Chief Peter Land said. "The husband was trying to fight them off using a shovel."

Police Chief Peter Land says the two officers used pepper spray and made loud noises to try to scare the animals away, but he says the dogs returned to confront the officers.

"The dogs are now literally circling the officer, showing their teeth, acting in a very aggressive manner," Land said. "Our officers certainly didn't want to shoot two dogs but the situation they were presented with they really had no choice."

Schild and her sister, Kara Michalec, say the Siberian Huskies were 3-year-old sisters that had never before attacked anyone, adding that they don't have "an aggressive bone in their body." They say the police report tells a different story.

"They had said in the report they weren't being aggressive," Michalec said. "Why did they take such vicious actions right away? And my question is if they were gonna put the animals down or they had to shoot them, why did each dog have to be shot several times?"

Michalec says she had wished Crown Point police called animal control instead, rather than "shooting loved dogs."

Land, however, says he stands by the officers.

"It was unfortunately the action that needed to be taken," Land argues.

FOX 32 talked to some neighbors who say the dogs stopped by their house shortly before they were shot. They say the dogs were friendly and playful.

Police say the huskies may have been mistaken for coyotes because they had been walking through a muddy stream and their white coats were streaked with mud.

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