'Bless my Hotshot crew': Survivor speaks at vigil - New York News

'Bless my Hotshot crew': Survivor speaks at vigil

Posted: Updated:
Brendan McDonough Brendan McDonough

By BRIAN SKOLOFF and FELICIA FONSECA

PRESCOTT VALLEY, Ariz. (AP) - On a day filled with speeches from dignitaries including the vice president, the words of the lone survivor of a fire crew overrun by flames resonated deepest in an arena packed with firefighters from around the nation.
 
A stone-faced Brendan McDonough filed onto the stage at the end of the service and offered what's called "The Hot Shot's Prayer," calmly reciting the words: "For if this day on the line I should answer death's call, Lord, bless my Hotshot crew, my family, one and all."
 
He concluded by telling the crowd: "Thank you, and I miss my brothers."
 
McDonough spoke at a memorial for the 19 members of the Prescott-based Granite Mountain Hotshots who died June 30 when a wind-fueled, out-of-control fire overran them as they tried to protect a former gold-mining town from the inferno.
 
Vice President Joe Biden called them "men of uncommon valor" while thanking God that one member of the crew survived unhurt.
 
"There's an old saying: All men are created equal, and then a few became firefighters," Biden said. "Thank God for you all. Thank God for your willingness to take the risks you do."
 
The event was marked by an outpouring of support from firefighters from across the country, who traveled to the Prescott area to honor their fallen brethren.
 
They talked about how firefighters are accustomed to answering the call of duty when the alarm sounds and sends them into harm's way, whether it's a fire in a forest, house or apartment. And they noted that the same can be said when a fellow firefighter dies.
 
"When you hear of a death, especially a group of firefighters, and there's 19 that we're here to mourn, there's no question that at the drop of a hat you do what you can to go and support the fire service and their families," said Capt. Steve Brown of the Rancho Cucamonga, who brought 17 others in his department of 85 uniformed firefighters from California.
 
The memorial in Prescott Valley began with a choir singing "On Eagle's Wings" as Biden sang along from the sidelines. Homeland Security Secretary and former Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano looked on, as did Sen. John McCain and his wife, Cindy, and other members of the state's congressional delegation.
 
Biden talked about the 1972 death of his wife and young daughter in a traffic crash, and how firefighters freed his sons from the mangled wreckage.
 
"I don't have the privilege of knowing any of these heroes personally, but I know them. I know them because they saved the lives of my two sons," Biden said. He also said firefighters rushed him to a hospital after he suffered an aneurysm in 1998, and he credited firefighters with saving his wife Jill after lightning once struck their home.  
 
Gov. Jan Brewer praised people around the country for responding as she hoped they would -- with candlelight vigils, financial contributions, prayers, and flowers and notes placed at makeshift memorials.
 
"Of course our hearts are filled with profound sadness today, but they're also filled with great pride," she said. "How wonderful is it to know that Arizona was home to 19 men like those we honor today."
 
Outside the minor league hockey arena, each of the 19 firefighters was represented by a U.S. flag and a purple ribbon with his name. A bronze statue of a wildland firefighter with an ax in hand, stood in front as if guarding the building.
 
Inside, each firefighter's name scrolled across an electronic board on two sides of the arena. Lined up in front of the stage were 19 sets of firefighting gear, complete with commemorative Pulaski tools similar to the ones the elite crew uses to dig lines around fires.
 
Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo gave the tools to the firefighters' families, along with flags that had been flown in their honor.
 
Alumni of the Granite Mountain Hotshots sat in the front rows, with about 1,000 members of the fallen firefighters' families surrounding them in seats on the floor of the arena. Those who first responded to the Yarnell Hill Fire sat in the rows behind them.
 
Darrell Willis, a Prescott Fire Department division chief, said he traveled with the crew a couple of years ago when they fought a fire in Colorado. On the way back, the unit stopped in Glenwood Springs and then climbed Storm King Mountain, where 14 firefighters died in 1994.
 
"We spent the entire sunny summer afternoon evaluating, studying, talking about what happened there 19 years ago," Willis said. "They were truly committed to never letting something like this ever happen again. They were committed to returning to you after every assignment. But there was another plan."
 
The highly specialized crew was part of a small community of Hotshots nationwide. There are only about 110 of the 20-person teams, mostly stationed west of the Mississippi River.
 
McDonough was assigned to give a "heads-up on the hillside" for the team on that fateful afternoon, said Prescott Fire Department spokesman Wade Ward. McDonough notified the crew of the rapidly changing weather that sent winds swirling erratically and caused the fire to cut off his team's escape route, then swiftly left his post for safety.
 
Ward has said it's just been too tough on McDonough, but that "he did exactly what he was supposed to."
 
Tuesday's memorial was the last of a handful of vigils for the men before the first of 19 funerals begin later in the week.
 
Ron Merrell, pastor of Heights Church, asked for comfort in an opening prayer, saying the past week has felt like "hell on Earth," leaving the families and firefighting community broken, confused, hurt and numb. He held up the firefighters as heroes who gave the ultimate sacrifice not only in death but in life.
 
Two tolls of a bell rang out as each firefighter's name was called, and a member of his family stood up in the audience.
 
An honor guard that included alumni of the Granite Mountain Hotshots carried the flags and Pulaski tools through the aisles, turning to face the family members who accepted the items on behalf of the firefighters.
 
Some of the family members then hugged others next to them, as the men's pictures flashed on screens overhead and the choir began singing "You Raise Me Up."
 
Other photos showed the men playing with their children, riding bikes, carrying crew members on their backs, hanging out at camp and in close encounters with fire.
 
Biden offered the families some solace as he wrapped up his remarks.
 
"As unbelievable as it is to even fathom ... the day will come when the memory of your husband, your son, or your dad or your brother will bring a smile to your lips before it brings a tear to your eye," he said. "My prayer for all of you is that that day will come sooner than later, but I promise you as unbelievable as it is, it will come."
 
Biden met privately with family members after the memorial.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Didn't find what
you were looking for?

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Dwayne Johnson hosts 'Hercules' screening for NYC children

    Dwayne Johnson hosts 'Hercules' screening for NYC children

    Thursday, July 24 2014 10:30 PM EDT2014-07-25 02:30:48 GMT
    When he's not slaying three-headed beasts with his olive-wood club, Hercules carves out time for the little people. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson treated fans from the Harlem Boys and Girls Club and Big Brothers Big Sisters NYC to an advance screening of his new film. I caught up with the larger-than-life action hero after the big surprise.
    When he's not slaying three-headed beasts with his olive-wood club, Hercules carves out time for the little people. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson treated fans from the Harlem Boys and Girls Club and Big Brothers Big Sisters NYC to an advance screening of his new film. I caught up with the larger-than-life action hero after the big surprise.
  • The Big Idea

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Thursday, July 24 2014 10:20 PM EDT2014-07-25 02:20:19 GMT
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
  • Suffolk County jail warden is highest-paid muni worker in NY

    Suffolk County jail warden is highest-paid muni worker in NY

    Thursday, July 24 2014 6:48 PM EDT2014-07-24 22:48:14 GMT
    New York State NewsNew York State News
    The Empire Center for Public Policy reports 1,803 local government employees outside of New York City have been paid more than Gov. Andrew Cuomo's $179,000 salary in the past year. The report from the fiscally conservative group for the year ending March 31 shows 47 of the 50 highest-paid municipal employees working for police departments or sheriff's offices and each taking home more than $250,000.
    The Empire Center for Public Policy reports 1,803 local government employees outside of New York City have been paid more than Gov. Andrew Cuomo's $179,000 salary in the past year. The report from the fiscally conservative group for the year ending March 31 shows 47 of the 50 highest-paid municipal employees working for police departments or sheriff's offices and each taking home more than $250,000.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices