Egyptian-Americans see regime change as positive - New York News

Egyptian-Americans see regime change as positive

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

Thousands of Egyptian-Americans have been following the fast-moving developments in the Middle East very closely.

At St. Mark's Church in Burr-Ridge, dozens of Coptic Christians with roots in Egypt gathered this evening, watching Arabic-language satellite TV. Even as some painted Egyptian flags on their bodies, they cheered the ouster of President Mohammad Morsi. They blame his Muslim Brotherhood movement for dozens of attacks on Egyptian Christians and their churches.

"We're praying for God to work a miracle, because the Egyptian people, whether Muslims or Christians, have been suffering for the past year-and-a-half under the Muslim Brotherhood reign," says Maria Abadir.

"I mean, it looks like a victory not just for the Egyptians, but for the world," says David. "We saw humanity and unity really come together today."

Sharing that view is Harwood Heights resident Ahmed Rehab, a Muslim civil rights activist who was also glued to satellite TV broadcasts tonight from his native Cairo. He disagreed with those calling the ouster of Mohammad Morsi a coup, blaming it on the Muslim Brotherhood's failure to reach to all segments of Egyptian society.

"His administration, his political ideology drove people away," says Rehab. "It made them feel he wasn't interested in the function and substance of democracy...only in its form."

Rehab said one of the first orders of business for Egypt must be a new constitution. Many of Morsi's critics--Muslim and Christian--faulted the Islamist-oriented constitution recently pushed through by Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood party. But they warn that trying to exclude the Brotherhood from politics could backfire and set the stage for violence. The Brotherhood has a lot of support, even after the economic disaster Morsi has presided over.

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