Strict new rules for this year's Westland Summer Festival - New York News

Strict new rules for this year's Westland Summer Festival

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Westland Deputy Police Chief Lt. Mike Matich Westland Deputy Police Chief Lt. Mike Matich
WESTLAND, Mich. (WJBK) -

City officials want to make sure thousands of people can enjoy the Westland Summer Festival. In years past, there has been a stabbing, a shooting and tons of fights.

"It appears that gangs want to open up shop here," said Westland Deputy Police Chief Lt. Mike Matich. "We want our residents to think it's fun and be safe coming here and enjoy it and not worry about the gangs chasing them away."

So Matich said strict new rules are in effect. Don't carry any bags, wear anything gang related or loiter in groups. Also, no alcohol or horseplay will be allowed. Any of those things can get you kicked out.

This year they will also be fencing off the entire area. You can't get into the festival unless you pay.

"Beginning Friday, everyone over the age of twelve years old has to make a ten dollar purchase. That purchase will be good for games, food or rides, but a purchase will be necessary to gain admission," said Frank Zaitshik, president of Wade Shows.

In past years, the biggest issues have been after the fireworks on Sunday night, but this year there will be extra uniformed officers on site from Westland, reserve units from other departments, state police and the Wayne County Sheriff's Department.

"If they see something that's out of place, there's going to be a lot of police officers around. Say something to somebody. Let us deal with it. That's what we're here for, and again we just want to make it safe," Matich said.

For more information on the festival, visit www.westlandfestival.org.

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