Court rulings draw criticism, praise in Atlanta - New York News

Court rulings draw criticism, praise in Atlanta

Posted: Updated:
ATLANTA -

The Supreme Court's rulings on gay marriage prompted strong reaction on both sides of the fence in Atlanta.

On one hand, some gay rights advocates say the rulings are a sign that they should push for legal marriages in our state..

On the other, some faith leaders say the ruling is a sign that the country is headed in the wrong direction.

DECISION DECRIED

Georgia is among roughly three-dozen states that ban gay marriage. Attorney General Sam Olens issued a statement saying the state would be unaffected by the high court ruling.

"The decision does not affect existing state definitions of marriage; in fact, it explicitly says that it is limited to marriages recognized by states as lawful," Olens said in the statement.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle said the Supreme Court appeared to have preserved states' rights.

"Back in 2004, we had this on the ballot and the people of Georgia spoke clearly about the issue. I think states' rights will be very important as we move forward," said Cagle.
 
Jerry Luquire, the head of the Georgia Christian Coalition, said he believes marriage should be between a man and a woman. He is among those expecting future court cases on the issue of gay marriage and state law.

"I think that there will be plaintiffs and defendants going to court with this as a background. A lot of court action is based on precedent and this will get some withstanding into court," said Luquire.

But for now at least, the Supreme Court rulings will have little direct impact on same-sex couples who want to marry in Georgia.

Rehoboth Baptist Church Pastor Troy Bush said he touched on the high court decision during his Wednesday night services. He said that he reminded the congregation to love unconditionally, but stay true to their values.

"We believe God's best and his design is for one man and one woman to be husband and wife in marriage," said Bush. "It's something that's been both a tradition culturally and legally in our country since the founding of our country, so we're disappointed in the decision. At the same time, we love our neighbors.

The 2004 ban of same sex marriage was overwhelmingly approved by Georgia voters. Since that time, national polls have shown movement in favor of gay marriage.

SUPPORTERS CELEBRATE RULING

Supporters of gay marriage held a rally in support of the Supreme Court's ruling at Piedmont Park in midtown Atlanta on Wednesday.

"I'm out here because this is the biggest thing to happen to the Constitutional law since Roe vs. Texas," said Rachel Buddy. "This means I can marry my fiancé and we can be seen as equal citizens."

Attendees of the rally carried signs and flags proclaiming their approval of the ruling.

"This is huge for equality and for people to stop treating same-sex couples as third-class citizens," said Sted Mays.

Seth and Nate Persily brought their 4-year-old twin girls to be a part of the moment.

"For our family, it means that these kids will have two legally married parents and that our family is equal to any other family out there. And we're not there yet in Georgia but we're so close,' said Seth Persily.

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed released a statement saying, "The Supreme Court ruling to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act was a courageous decision and is an enormous victory for loving, married couples and their families. It is my hope that today's decision puts our nation on an inevitable path toward the day when all citizens, regardless of their sexual orientation, can enjoy equal protection under the law and marry the ones they love. "

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Community celebrates renovated Queens Library branch damaged by Sandy

    Community celebrates renovated Queens Library branch damaged by Sandy

    Friday, April 18 2014 4:57 PM EDT2014-04-18 20:57:15 GMT
    It's been nearly a year and a half since Superstorm Sandy tore through the Queens Library Arverne branch in the Rockaways. Now it is back in business.Sandy left behind 4 feet of water. A massive renovation -- gutting, cleaning, repainting, rewiring -- was needed to get everything back up to speed. The library, which reopened March 18, is a vital part of the community.
    It's been nearly a year and a half since Superstorm Sandy tore through the Queens Library Arverne branch in the Rockaways. Now it is back in business.Sandy left behind 4 feet of water. A massive renovation -- gutting, cleaning, repainting, rewiring -- was needed to get everything back up to speed. The library, which reopened March 18, is a vital part of the community.
  • NYPD identifies woman wanted for baby snatch attempt

    NYPD: Woman tried to snatch baby in stroller

    Friday, April 18 2014 4:36 PM EDT2014-04-18 20:36:31 GMT
    Police want to question a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. The incident occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 4 p.m. on Thursday. The 8-month-old baby was not harmed. People who were in the area jumped in to stop the woman before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police. A sketch was released on Friday of the suspect.

    Police are looking for a woman who tried to push a stroller with a baby inside away from a nanny in Chelsea. Police have identified the suspect as Tara Anne McDonald, 46. The attempted kidnapping occurred on 8th Ave. and 17th St. at about 3:45 p.m. on Thursday, police said. People who were in the area jumped in to stop McDonald before she took off southbound on 8th Ave., according to police.


  • Basil farm ready to switch to marijuana

    Basil farm ready to switch to marijuana

    Friday, April 18 2014 4:11 PM EDT2014-04-18 20:11:50 GMT
    Basil plants grow on a New Jersey farm, but the facility could be turned into a five-acre medical marijuana greenhouse with only 48 hours' notice. The hoses from the state-of-the-art Dutch hydroponic system are watering flowers now, but with a few minor adjustments could just as easily grow marijuana plants for medicinal cannabis. The only reason it's not happening now is because the company is publicly traded and subject to federal law.
    Basil plants grow on a New Jersey farm, but the facility could be turned into a five-acre medical marijuana greenhouse with only 48 hours' notice. The hoses from the state-of-the-art Dutch hydroponic system are watering flowers now, but with a few minor adjustments could just as easily grow marijuana plants for medicinal cannabis. The only reason it's not happening now is because the company is publicly traded and subject to federal law.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices