Adidas unveils running shoe with springs - New York News

Adidas unveils running shoe with springs

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Photo courtesy Adidas America Photo courtesy Adidas America
Adidas' website graphic introducing the Springblade. Adidas' website graphic introducing the Springblade.
MYFOXNY.COM -

Sports apparel and shoe company Adidas has just announced a new running shoe that claims it will release more energy every stride you take on the road to the finish line. How? With 16 "high-tech" plastic so-called Energy Blades instead of the usual foam midsole.

The shoe is called (what else) the Springblade.

"The highly elastic blades instantaneously react to any environment, compressing and releasing energy to create an efficient push-off that feels like you have springs under your feet," the company claims in a press release.

But does that concept really work? Runner's World magazine, which conducts extensive tests on running shoes, is skeptical. Although RW hasn't yet thoroughly tested the shoe, it points out that "gains from energy return may be offset by the added weight of the shoe." The shoe is set to weigh in at 12.8 ounces, three ounces heavier than the company's other springy shoe called the Energy Boost.

Adidas introduced the shoe this week with the hashtag #springblade and an email signup form on its website so that runners can get in a virtual line to buy the shoes as soon as they come out.

The Springblade will be available on August 1 and retail for $200, according to the press release. That's a significant premium above even some of the most expensive running shoes on the market already. For example, the top-of-the-line shoe model from Newtown costs $175. The Brooks Adrenaline GTS, one of the best-selling shoes at running specialty stores, retails for a comparatively reasonable $110.

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