Rapper Fat Joe sentenced in NJ for tax case - New York News

Rapper Fat Joe sentenced in NJ for tax case

Fat Joe (Joseph Cartagena) outside court in Newark, N.J., Dec. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Samantha Henry, file) Fat Joe (Joseph Cartagena) outside court in Newark, N.J., Dec. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Samantha Henry, file)

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) - Rapper "Fat Joe" has been sentenced to four months in prison after admitting he failed to file federal income taxes.

The platinum-selling artist, whose real name is Joseph Cartagena, apologized to his family and supporters before being sentenced Monday in federal court in Newark.

He pleaded guilty in December 2012 to failing to pay taxes on more than $1 million of income in 2007 and in 2008.

U.S. Magistrate Cathy Waldor said she took into consideration the government's allegation that Cartagena failed to taxes on some $3 million in income for years 2007 through 2010, an estimated tax loss to the government of $718,038.

The Miami Beach resident was prosecuted in New Jersey because some of the companies he earns money from are incorporated in Somerville.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • EntertainmentMore>>

  • Shawn Mendes on Good Day New York

    Shawn Mendes on Good Day New York

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 9:59 AM EDT2014-07-22 13:59:34 GMT
    The newest Internet sensation is Canadian singer Shawn Mendes. Born and raised in Toronto, Mendes, 15, says he would come home from school and spend hours watching YouTube users cover songs and learn how to play the guitar.  The teen's music went viral after posting a Vine clip of himself singing the chorus to Justin Bieber’s “As Long as You Love Me.” The next morning, Mendes had 10,000 likes and followers.
    The newest Internet sensation is Canadian singer Shawn Mendes. Born and raised in Toronto, Mendes, 15, says he would come home from school and spend hours watching YouTube users cover songs and learn how to play the guitar. The teen's music went viral after posting a Vine clip of himself singing the chorus to Justin Bieber’s “As Long as You Love Me.” The next morning, Mendes had 10,000 likes and followers.
  • The present and the future of news and journalism

    The present and the future of news and journalism

    Monday, July 21 2014 10:23 PM EDT2014-07-22 02:23:11 GMT
    News isn't breaking -- it's already broken apart into something completely different than it once was. And all you need are these two reliable sources to verify that fact: the millennial generation and one a few before it.It's unclear what's scarier: how much news has changed or that someone knows Joel Waldman and not Murrow, Cronkite or Brokaw. Either way, with the emergence of everything from Twitter and Facebook and alternative news websites from Mashable to Gawker.
    News isn't breaking -- it's already broken apart into something completely different than it once was. And all you need are these two reliable sources to verify that fact: the millennial generation and one a few before it.It's unclear what's scarier: how much news has changed or that someone knows Joel Waldman and not Murrow, Cronkite or Brokaw. Either way, with the emergence of everything from Twitter and Facebook and alternative news websites from Mashable to Gawker.
  • The power of music

    The power of music

    Monday, July 21 2014 6:20 PM EDT2014-07-21 22:20:39 GMT
    Music is a powerful force that impacts how we feel, think and react to many things in life. Music has healing power, sets a mood and even influences how we eat and shop. Whether you're at the grocery store or shoe shopping, there's usually music on. Music is everywhere and we can listen to whatever we want.
    Music is a powerful force that impacts how we feel, think and react to many things in life. Music has healing power, sets a mood and even influences how we eat and shop. Whether you're at the grocery store or shoe shopping, there's usually music on. Music is everywhere and we can listen to whatever we want.
  • New Jersey NewsNew Jersey NewsMore>>

  • Not guilty plea from driver in NJ police officer death

    Not guilty plea from driver in NJ police officer death

    The man accused of driving the tractor-trailer that slammed into a police officer operating a radar gun in Waldwick, New Jersey, has pleaded not guilty to vehicular homicide. Ryan Cumberbatch, of Brooklyn, made an initial court appearance in Hackensack on Monday. Cumberbatch only spoke during the brief hearing to say he understood the charge. His attorney said they wouldn't comment out of respect for the police officer's family.
    The man accused of driving the tractor-trailer that slammed into a police officer operating a radar gun in Waldwick, New Jersey, has pleaded not guilty to vehicular homicide. Ryan Cumberbatch, of Brooklyn, made an initial court appearance in Hackensack on Monday. Cumberbatch only spoke during the brief hearing to say he understood the charge. His attorney said they wouldn't comment out of respect for the police officer's family.
  • Jane Dornick "BusyBusy Mom" please guilty to sexual exploitation of a minor

    Jane Dornick "BusyBusy Mom" please guilty to sexual exploitation of a minor

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 10:30 AM EDT2014-07-22 14:30:37 GMT
    Photo courtesy of TAPinto.netPhoto courtesy of TAPinto.net
    South Plainfield resident Jane Dornick, 53, pleaded guilty, prior to the selection of a jury, to Count One of an indictment charging her with three counts of sexual exploitation of a child. Dornick was arrested on Feb. 19, 2013. The remaining counts will be dismissed at sentencing. Dornick entered her plea before U.S. District Judge Freda L. Wolfson in Trenton federal court.
    South Plainfield resident Jane Dornick, 53, pleaded guilty, prior to the selection of a jury, to Count One of an indictment charging her with three counts of sexual exploitation of a child. Dornick was arrested on Feb. 19, 2013. The remaining counts will be dismissed at sentencing. Dornick entered her plea before U.S. District Judge Freda L. Wolfson in Trenton federal court.
  • AT&T cell antennas face legal snag; public will make its case Sept. 18 before vote

    AT&T cell antennas face legal snag; public will make its case Sept. 18 before vote

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 10:28 AM EDT2014-07-22 14:28:36 GMT
    Photo courtesy of TAPinto.netPhoto courtesy of TAPinto.net
    In November of last year, ATT attorney Judy Fairweather promised: "I will come back with an army (of experts)" in her bid to convince the Zoning Board of Adjustment to grant multiple variances that would allow her company to install 12 cell antennas on the NJ American Water Tower on Buxton Road. At the end of the meeting on Thursday, Fairweather all but sounded retreat after bowing to the request by residents, who asked that the next meeting be moved to Sept. 18.
    In November of last year, ATT attorney Judy Fairweather promised: "I will come back with an army (of experts)" in her bid to convince the Zoning Board of Adjustment to grant multiple variances that would allow her company to install 12 cell antennas on the NJ American Water Tower on Buxton Road. At the end of the meeting on Thursday, Fairweather all but sounded retreat after bowing to the request by residents, who asked that the next meeting be moved to Sept. 18.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices