Runners try to 'beat the heat' during race in 100 degree temps - New York News

Runners try to 'beat the heat' during race in 100 degree temps

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -

It wasn't your typical race.

It was held in the valley at 2:47 Saturday afternoon, the exact time it struck 122 degrees in Phoenix back on June 26, 1990.

If you were in Arizona, you remember it, and you know it's no time to be running around the valley.

But people who took part in the race were out to prove something.

More than 1,000 people tried to test their bodies and prove that the heat was no match for them.

There were anxious moments before the start, runners weren't just trying to beat out each other, but daring to beat the heat.

"I'm a triathelete so we have to a little bit crazy to be out here," said Andre Lee.

The first Beat the Heat race in Scottsdale invited runners to race during the days highest temperatures.

The takeoff time was at 2:47 p.m., exactly the time when temperatures climbed to 122 degrees back in 1990.

"I'm glad there's a breeze. It's going to be awesome. Cool towel, frozen hat, I'm fine. It's only three miles," said Sherilyn McLain.

And after the race...

"It was a lot harder than I thought, a lot hotter than expected. I didn't feel any wind, but it was awesome," said McLain.

There were about 1,000 runners from across the globe trying to make it to the finish line and beat the heat.

"Oh my God, thank god the heat didn't beat me," said Nahom Mesfin, who's from Ethiopia.

But that glaring sun got the best of some runners.

Runners cooled down with cold water and fans.

"Whenever I see finish line, I knew there was cold water," said BLANK.

Still, medics needed to treat at least two runners on site for heat exhaustion.

The heat is a tough competitor, one some say they're not willing to face again.

It hovered around 100 degrees at the race Saturday, nowhere near the 122 degree record breaking heat from 1990.

Everyone FOX 10 talked to say they're proud to say they beat the heat.

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