Man says fatal shooting of friend was accidental - New York News

Man says fatal shooting of friend was accidental

Posted: Updated:
Joe Colter Joe Colter
GLENDALE, Ariz. -

A man allegedly accidentally shot his friend at an apartment near 55th Avenue and Camelback Road late Wednesday night.

Joe Colter, one of four people who met with Glendale police officers, told them he had accidentally shot his friend and needed medical help, a police report stated.

Officers found a man at the apartment who had a gunshot wound to the upper right chest/shoulder area. He was taken to a hospital where he later died.

A police report stated that Colter said he bought a 9MM handgun about three months ago for personal protection. He had gotten it from an Internet website called "Backpage," even though he is under 21-years-old.

Colter, the shooting victim and the other three people were all in the apartment hanging out and playing video games when Colter started joking around about having a gun, the report revealed.

Colter said in an interview that he took the gun out and racked the slide behind his back with the intent of ejecting the chambered round, but made a mistake and left the magazine in the gun.  

The racking of the slide ejected the chambered round, but also chambered a second round, leaving the handgun loaded.

A police report stated that Colter pointed the gun in the direction of the man and then pulled the trigger expecting to hear a "click."

Instead, the gun allegedly went off and a bullet struck the man in the chest.

Colter told police he immediately began to help the man. According to the police report, Colter considered the shooting victim a close friend.

Detectives interviewed two witnesses told police that Colter and the victim were friends and the shooting was not the result of an argument or fight.

Both witnesses agreed the shooting was unintentional.

Colter faces charges of reckless manslaughter.

Didn't find what
you were looking for?

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices