Philly Schools Send Out Pink Slips As Part Of 'Doomsday Budget' - New York News

Philly Schools Send Out Pink Slips As Part Of 'Doomsday Budget'

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PHILADELPHIA -

The so-called "doomsday budget" is going into effect, forcing hundreds of Philadelphia School District teachers, aids and counselors out of their jobs.

Superintendent William Hite held a late-afternoon press conference right to announce that nearly 3,800 employees will lose their jobs. That includes 127 assistant principals, or all but three of them.

Counselors, support staff and even 676 teachers, are in the same situation.

These massive cuts are all the result of the "doomsday budget" that was passed just last week, an effort to trim the district's $300-million deficit.

Last week, students and teachers rallied because the cuts meant that athletic programs, music and art programs will all be slashed.

FOX 29's Omari Fleming also got a chance to talk to a couple of counselors who will likely be laid off. Their major concern is how students will cope with the issues outside of just education.

"You know, the kind of issues that we deal with on a daily basis can be horrific, overwhelming. And the question is, who will do that job? Who will take on that responsibility for the students in the fall? And it's just an atrocity," counselor Tami Jackson-Tilman said.

"The very people who help the most at-risk children who are being the first to be laid off. Now, they have to do that under state law and under the contract, but it's a very sad day," said Donna Cooper, executive director of Citizens for Children and Youth.

These cuts could be rescinded because the budget could be amended.

The superintendent is waiting on the state, the city and also some concessions from the union, hoping that they'll be able to get some money from those entities so they can bring programs and jobs back, FOX 29's Omari Fleming reported from outside school district headquarters Friday night.

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