Suburban druggies leaving syringes on our street, Detroiters say - New York News

Suburban druggies leaving syringes on our street, Detroiters say

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A syringe left behind on Wagner Street in southwest Detroit. A syringe left behind on Wagner Street in southwest Detroit.
DETROIT (WJBK) -

They keep the grass cut, plant trees and try to pick up the trash left behind. Despite the looters and illegal dumpers, residents who are trying to survive on Wagner Street do their best to keep the southwest Detroit neighborhood clean.

"The block is just terrible. It's all day long every day," said Cece Lane. "They sit, shoot their dope, toss the needles all out the window."

Lane took us on a walk pointing out needle after needle left behind by people they say come to Detroit to buy their drugs, park on their street and leave the dangerous and dirty remnants behind.

"These are not just kids. These are grown men, all Caucasian people," Lane said. "Nice cars."

Fed up, Lane has started taking license plate numbers down. Other neighbors have confronted them, but they don't budge.

"They still sitting there with the needle in their arm. We're knocking on the door like, "Hey, hey, can you take that somewhere else," Lane said.

"I've actually seen one tying his hand ready to inject," said Michael Quinones. "I feel they're kind of disrespecting me and the neighborhood."

"They go and they leave syringes and little baggies of the drugs or whatever they buy."

Quinones and his wife have a four-year-old child who they won't even let play outside.

This may be new to their neighborhood, but it's a problem that has been going on in Detroit for years. According to a police source who worked narcotics, he said you can bet a new dope house likely popped up in the area. People come in from the suburbs, buy their drugs, park, get their fix and go home.

Police just responded to the same complaints in the area of Martin and Bruckner a few miles away.

"They figure it's so scarce, the houses or whatever around here, nobody's watching them, but we're watching them," Lane said.

Lane plans to turn the license plate numbers over to police.

Meanwhile, police say call them if you see a dope house in the area. The more complaints they receive on one specific location, it moves to the top of the list and they can come and shut it down.

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