Travel myths: 5 things you need to know - New York News

Travel myths: 5 things you need to know

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PHOENIX -

If you're planning a summer trip, the pros at AAA say there are five travel myths you need to be aware of before you hit the road or book that airfare. And they could save you time and money.

From airport security to booking online, travel has changed considerably over the last decade.

Myth number one: using a travel agent costs more.

"They're privy to information and discounts. Industry information and discounts not open to the general public," says Stephanie Dembowski, AAA ARIZONA.

Myth number two: always purchase the insurance at the rental car counter.

"What you're paying for there is peace of mind. You really need to check your own insurance policy to see if you are going to be covered in that situation."

Agents say if you determine that before you get to the counter, you won't feel pressured to make an on the spot decision.

Myth number three: score on airfare by waiting until the last minute.

"Unfortunately those days are for the most part over. There are fewer planes in the sky and fewer seats in the air and really you're going to be paying a premium if you wait until the last minute."

Another myth: everything costs extra on a plane.

If you want the whole can of soda or the whole bottle of water, just ask. Most airlines still provide this free of charge.

Myth number five: buy foreign currency before leaving the United States.

"Actually in most cases you'll get a better rate if you exchange your money in the country that you're visiting."

Travel agents recommend taking a little bit of foreign currency with you in case you need it for a taxi ride or need to buy something when you get off the plane.

Triple A Arizona predicts 618,000 Arizonans will hit the road this weekend. More than 57,000 are flying somewhere this weekend.


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