Prescott students accused of hacking on grades - New York News

PD: Prescott students hacked into teachers' computers, changed grades

Updated:
PRESCOTT, Ariz. -

Three students almost finished the year with good grades -- but not because they earned them -- because they purchased a device that allowed them to hack into their teachers' computers and change their grades.

School is out for Prescott High and students are starting to enjoy their summer break. But three students won't be enjoying much after being taken away from school in handcuffs.

"It was bizarre, the FBI was there, two of the three kids got hauled away in handcuffs," says Clinton Lindberg.

Prescott Police say the 16-year old students are behind a high-tech cheating scheme all to change their grades.

The young men allegedly used key logger software -- a device that records what you type -- to gather teachers' passwords. From there, police say the students logged into the schools computers and changed their grades.

When several teachers in the school noticed the better grades, they notified authorizes.

"They do need to be punished for something like that. I don't think you should ever change your grades," says Kirsi Eby.

Police say the students eventually admitted to changing their grades. Now they are facing felony charges for computer tampering.

"Felony charges for just trying to get better grades. But felony, I think that's pretty bad," says Jamie Bender.

District officials say they have no part in the arrests, and they say the school has its own punishment for the students. The district won't tell us what that is, but they do say they just followed their policies by telling police about the students actions.

"What they choose to do with that information and charges they make is up to them," says Dave Smucker, Superintendent.

"Kids should stay in class and get all their work done and not have to go through a federal crime in order to get passing grades," says Lindberg.

Police booked the three students into County Juvenile Detention Center.

Those students face charges for both computer tampering and tampering with public records. They are juveniles so their names won't be released.


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