Juror in 70s death penalty case sympathizes with Jodi Arias jury - New York News

Juror in 70s death penalty case sympathizes with Jodi Arias jury

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PHOENIX -

So what is it like for the jury right now, deciding the fate of Jodi Arias after so many months of testimony? We sat down with one valley man who has been in that situation, and he says it's not an easy thing to do.

The man we talked to was on a trial where the jurors had to decide whether the defendant would live or die.

He says it was a very difficult and gut-wrenching decision, and even though it's been more than 40 years since the trial, he still finds it difficult to talk about.

Robert Nesselrode knows all too well what it's like to serve as a juror on a high profile trial. He was on the jury that convicted 16-year-old Louis Taylor of starting the fire at the Pioneer Hotel in Tucson in 1970 that killed 29 people.

The jury had to decide if he would get life in prison or the death penalty.

"It really gets really heavy - most people were pretty quiet about it - because we had to wrestle with this," says Robert Nesselrode.

He knows what the arias jurors are going through as they deliberate her fate.

He says after his six-week trial, jurors were edgy and tired.

"But really we got kind of fed up with one another. There weren't any hostilities or anything, but when you're locked up with somebody - I can't imagine being a prisoner, and being in even a smaller place," says Nesselrode.

"When you hear the same thing over and over and over again, and you just want to sometimes scream and say let's just move on with this thing."

The jury found Taylor guilty and sentenced him to life in prison. He was released last month after serving 42 years. He pleaded no contest to the charges.

Nesselrode says he still feels they got the verdict right.

"And because of that, I don't really care what trial it is, I believe the jury. Because they're the ones that are there the whole period of time, and they see all the evidence."

He said the jurors did get together after the trial was over to finally relax without any restrictions on what they could say.

It's not yet clear if any of the members of the arias jury will be talking after the sentencing.


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