NYPD investigates more bias attacks - New York News

NYPD investigates more bias attacks

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Just a few days after Mark Carson, 32, was killed for being gay, and only a few hours after a massive rally in the west village calling for an end to the anti-gay violence, it happened again: two more attacks; one late Monday night, the other early Tuesday morning.

Mayor Mike Bloomberg and NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, standing with the commanders of the NYPD's Hate Crimes and Special Victims Units, made it clear these attacks will not be tolerated.

The incident Monday night involved two men, who police say, had met at the Bowery Mission and went out drinking together in the East Village. After leaving a bar, the 45-year-old victim told police his drinking companion, "just snapped" and hit him many times, knocking him unconscious.

The suspect, Roman Gornell, 39, remains at large. Anyone with information should call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS. The victim was taken to the hospital with facial injuries, but is expected to be okay.

In the second attack early Tuesday morning, two suspects were arrested -- a 32-year-old man and a 23-year-old man. Police said the men attacked two gay men walking along Broadway in SoHo, taunting them with gay slurs before pouncing on them. Those two men, aside from bruises and a black eye, were otherwise okay.

But Mark Carson did not suffer the same fate. He was shot and killed early Saturday morning while walking along West 8th Street in the West Village. His alleged attacker, Elliot Morales, 33, reportedly bragged to police about the crime after being arrested saying he shot Carson for being gay. Morales, an ex con, is now facing charges including second degree murder as a hate crime.

While overall, hate crime is down in the city, anti-gay violence is up 70 percent compared to last year. Officials say the spike may be generally under-reported incidents now being reported because of the intense exposure.

Whatever the reason, city leaders and many New Yorkers say they are not willing to tolerate any longer.

The NYPD is adding extra police patrols in the areas where these attacks occurred.

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