Ocean City Rebuilds Beaches - New York News

Ocean City Rebuilds Beaches

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OCEAN CITY, N.J. -

Pounding winds and violent surf from Hurricane Sandy left their mark on Ocean City.

Beaches were washed out and there's concern about debris washing up.

But Mayor Jay Gillian says no need to worry. They're open for business.

"We've been ready. Working since Halloween to get back in shape."

 It's full speed ahead for the beach rebuild and cleanup in Ocean City after Super Storm Sandy.

On the north end what Sandy washed away, the ongoing 150-million dollar federal beach-replenishment project is restoring.

Sand is separated from ocean water siphoned through a pipeline then used to fill in the beach.

Gillian says the Ocean City Public Works Department does daily checks for debris.

"Every morning between 4 and 5  in the morning they do a beach sweep. They rake some of the beaches."

City officials have reported seeing wood and wires along with other potential hazards turning up.

There's also concern that as children play and people start swarming the beach this holiday weekend, more debris will be unearthed.

Especially on the south end where new sand was trucked in.

"When we put the sand back on we sifted some of our beach sand. We've been keeping an eye on it. We've been trucking a lot of sand in," explained the mayor.

Earl Paul is one of Ocean City's resident beach experts.

"Rain or shine I'm here." 

He says it's not the debris that he's worried about.

"They did a great job. The guys that put the sand in were unbelievable. I  think the way they moved and finished it. It's really good it's more about wheat her than beach."

Though the beach is open the mayor says there are  small sections of  beach that  will be closed at times as part of the replenishment plan. Mayor Gillian says it'll be completed at the latest by mid-June.

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