Meet Prosecutors, Investigators, Cop Behind Gosnell Case - New York News

Meet Prosecutors, Investigators, Cop Behind Gosnell Case

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PHILADELPHIA -

"Next to 9-1-1, this is number two for me."

Terry Lewis and his fellow veteran Crime Scene Investigators have processed thousands of gruesome crime scenes over their careers, including the World Trade Center disaster, but what they saw inside Doctor Kermit Gosnell's abortion clinic back in 2010 was a nightmare.

"This is a case no one is going to forget," Lewis said. "This is something that will go down in the history of Philadelphia and hopefully we'll never have to revisit this kind of case again."

"This one's kind of hard to wash off," Crime Scene Investigator John Taggart told Fox 29..

Taggart spent hour after hour photographing and processing evidence at the Lancaster Avenue office and days at the medical examiner's office detailing Gosnell's gruesome crimes.

"Very disturbing to see something that small,and it is a baby," Taggart explained. "Fingers, arms, legs. They're not fetuses, they're babies."

"I'm glad we got the conviction that we did," said former city narcotics Officer James Woods who actually uncovered Gosnell's clinic during a prescription drug investigation, based on a tip from an informant.

"Going into this clinic it was the worst , everything that's been said about it, you could believe it," Woods told a noon time press conference packed with reporters at the District Attorney's office.

Assistant DA Joanne Pescatore helped prosecute the case. She too spent hours documenting the evidence and preparing the case for trial with a team of prosecutors and investigators.

"It was beyond belief that something like that could happen in a city such as this," she said. "I just thank God that we were able to do something about it."

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