2 Men Accused Of Pulling Off Major Haul Dozens Of Times - New York News

2 Men Accused Of Pulling Off Major Haul Dozens Of Times

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PHILADELPHIA -

Police say tools helped track down a major thief in Bucks County.

How's it possible to steal all of these items? That's just one of many questions in a crazy story, FOX 29's Stephanie Salvatore reports.

"We still have a lot of tools. We made a lot of phone calls," said Officer Steve Mancuso, of the Philadelphia Police said.

This is only a small portion of what was recovered from the homes of two men who police say had been riding a crime wave for more than 6 months.

The investigation began in July of 2012, when police started receiving reports of dozens of contractors' work vans being stolen, along with hundreds of pieces of equipment inside, like drills, saws, compressors, generators ladders and tool kits.

Dozens of tips to the Philadelphia and Bensalem Police Departments led police to the homes of 38-year-old David Zagami's in Croydon and 37-year-old Eric Guerra Chacon in Philadelphia, where thousands of stolen items were found.

"What we thought was a rather small operation, and it turned out it was a lot larger than we thought," Mancuso said.

Police say Zagami was the one stealing the vans and the equipment inside before abandoning the vans not far from his home. Neighbors tell us they would see him unloading equipment into his house but never thought anything of it.

Guerra Chacon was then allegedly given the equipment to sell.

The tools were brought to the Major Crimes Auto Squad, where contractors have been claiming tools marked with their names and initials. Police say the value of the tools is upwards of $750,000.

"We had a lot of surprised looks. A lot of contractors were grateful that they got their stuff back, some of the stuff. Other guys weren't so lucky," Mancuso said.

Zagami is being held on $1.1 million bail and charged with theft and related crimes. Guerra Chacon is charged with receiving stolen equipment and conspiracy, Salvatore reported.

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