U-M softball coach teaches life lessons in fight against cancer - New York News

Michigan softball coach teaches life lessons in fight against breast cancer

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Michigan softball coach Carol Hutchins Michigan softball coach Carol Hutchins
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (WJBK) -

Michigan softball coach Carol Hutchins is the winningest coach in the university's history. She hasn't had a losing season since she took over in 1985. But what's really impressive? She's teaching the young women in her program that winning isn't everything and that the toughest opponent they may face in life, may be off the field.

"We're teaching the game life," says Hutchins. "That's what (my players) ultimately learn, that you're a part of something bigger than yourself."

Hutchins has been racking up Big Ten titles for over 25 years. Under her direction, the Wolverines became the first woman's softball team east of the Mississippi to win a College World Series. But Hutchins says the Michigan Softball Academy is the highlight of what she's done at Michigan. The annual academy is a gathering of breast cancer survivors, caregivers, families and friends to benefit the Making Strides for Breast Cancer program. To date, they've raised $250,000

"Everybody knows what we're here for," says Hutchins. "There's a number of survivors that join us. It's a great event. It is the highlight of what I've been able to do here at Michigan."

The softball academy is open to everyone ages 21 and over. No athletic ability is required. Just be prepared to have fun and experience the power of making a difference.

"It's our hope that we can help in some way."

Details:
2013 Michigan Softball Academy
Thursday, May 2, 2013
Click here to learn more and to sign up

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