Dayton against tax expansion, but doesn't threaten veto - New York News

Dayton against tax expansion, but doesn't threaten veto

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  • Dayton against tax expansion, but doesn't threaten vetoMore>>

  • TAX DEBATE: Extend sales tax to clothing?

    TAX DEBATE: Extend sales tax to clothing?

    Tuesday, April 30 2013 1:01 PM EDT2013-04-30 17:01:28 GMT
    One of the most controversial and highly-publicized components of the tax bill approved by the Minnesota Senate on Monday is the push to tax clothing -- but many are pushing back.
    One of the most controversial and highly-publicized components of the tax bill approved by the Minnesota Senate on Monday is the push to tax clothing -- but many are pushing back.
  • Tax bill blunder shows shenanigans in divided Minn. Senate

    Tax bill blunder shows shenanigans in divided Minn. Senate

    Monday, April 29 2013 11:13 PM EDT2013-04-30 03:13:28 GMT
    The Minnesota Senate proved it is divided on taxes on Monday after passing a package of income, property and sales tax hikes hours after voting it down.
    The Minnesota Senate proved it is divided on taxes on Monday after passing a package of income, property and sales tax hikes hours after voting it down.
ST. PAUL, Minn. (KMSP) -

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton is still against extending taxes onto the middle class, but won't threaten a veto of the tax bill that cleared the Senate late Monday.

The Minnesota Senate showed its division on taxes Monday after passing a package of income, property and sales tax hikes hours after voting it down.

The bill would cut state sales tax to 6 percent by dramatically broadening the base of what is taxed -- including clothing, over-the-counter drugs and personal services like haircuts. Tickets to sporting events would also be taxed, as would golf lessons and auto repairs.

On Tuesday, Dayton reaffirmed he's strongly against expanding the sales tax, especially on clothing and wants to keep sales taxes where they are.

The Senate bill also raises the top income tax bracket, meaning a couple making $140,000 annually could see their taxes go up nearly 20 percent.

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