Amanda Knox speaks out to magazine before tell-all book hits sto - New York News

Amanda Knox speaks out to magazine before tell-all book hits stores

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PHOENIX -

Did she or didn't she?

It's a question of lot of people who followed the Amanda Knox trial in Italy are wondering.

Did she kill her roommate in a drug fueled sex orgy like Italian prosecutors claim?

Well, Knox is ready to tell her side of the story.

The story became a media firestorm because of the sex, drugs, and lies -- all the ingredients made for television.

The Italian media called her "foxy-Knoxy" and now Amanda Knox is ready to tell the world what she says really happened in her memoir called "Waiting to be Heard."
    
"What's important for me to say is just thank you to everyone who has believed in me, who has defended me," said Knox.

It's been 18 months since Amanda Knox returned to her home in Seattle and the 25-year-old says she is still paralyzed by fear and has no plans to return to Italy.   

"As far as she's concerned, that's something she just wants to leave in the past and she's just trying to move on with her life," said Julie Jordan, editor of "People."

Knox's life forever changed in November 2007.

She was an exchange student in Italy when police found the dead body of her roommate, Meredith Kercher, with her throat slit.

Italian prosecutors charged Knox and her boyfriend Raffeale Sollecito with killing her in a drug fueled sexual assault after Kercher refused to take part in an orgy.

Knox and her boyfriend were convicted of the murder.

She was sentenced to 26 years in prison.

"I am not what they say. I am not a promiscuous vamp. I am not violent," said Knox.

Knox and Sollecito appealed the conviction and both were acquitted and set free.

"I'm really overwhelmed right now. I was looking down from the airplane and it seemed like everything wasn't real," said Knox.

Knox returned to Seattle in October 2011 and soon after, got busy writing a book about her ordeal. She wanted to tell her side of the story.
    
In an interview with "People" magazine, on news stands Friday, Knox says the death of her former roommate, Meredith Kercher, still haunts her.

"We sat down with Amanda Knox and really just got down to her emotions, how long her ordeal was, how she kept herself motivated, to survive it was very daunting as you can imagine," said Jordan.

In her memoir, on book stands Tuesday, Knox talks about contemplating suicide and fighting off guards in the Italian prison, where she spent four years of her life.

She describes that time as an invasion of her privacy where guards were leering, touching and in her space.

"She still has moments of anxiety and this was just an opportunity for her to really try to show us how she's trying to move on with her life. It's difficult, most of us cannot imagine. She's just really hopeful for the future and hopeful to put all this behind, it's a very moving interview," said Jordan.

Knox told "People" she hopes Meredith Kercher's family reads her book.

Knox is in Seattle, in college and dating a man she remained close to during her trial.

Her boyfriend used to write her letters in prison.

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