Widow of 9/11 victim pushes against knives on planes - New York News

Widow of 9/11 victim pushes against knives on planes

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PHOENIX -

Knives on planes would have been allowed for the first time since the September 11th terrorist attacks starting Thursday. But the TSA decided to postpone that decision after facing opposition from pilots and flight attendants.

As you remember, the terrorists were able to hijack the planes on 9/11 using box cutters.

Rebecca Marchand is leading the opposition to allowing knives on planes. Her husband was a flight attendant on one of the planes hijacked on 9/11.

She welcomed news of the postponement, but says she doesn't know why the TSA is even considering lifting the ban.

"It's a slap in the face to families of 9/11. Box cutters is what the terrorist used, and small knives are box cutters, so what they are saying is we don't care what happened to the families," said Marchand.

She's taken her concerns to the president, the head of the TSA, and the head of the Department of Homeland Security. Marchand hopes the postponement will be made permanent.

TSA Administrator John Pistole proposed the policy change last month, saying it would free up the agency to concentrate on protecting against greater threats. TSA screeners confiscate about 2,000 small folding knives from passengers every day.

The proposed policy would have permitted folding knives with blades that are 2.36 inches or less in length and are less than 1/2-inch wide. The policy was aimed at allowing passengers to carry pen knives, corkscrews with small blades and other small knives.
 
Passengers also would have been be allowed to bring onboard as part of their carry-on luggage novelty-sized baseball bats less than 24 inches long, toy plastic bats, billiard cues, ski poles, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and two golf clubs.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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