'Cannabis Craze' board game celebrates pot trade - New York News

'Cannabis Craze' board game celebrates pot trade

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A new board game out of Denver puts a unique spin on Monopoly. The game's creators unveiled the "Cannabis Craze" board game after marijuana use became legal in Colorado. The goal of the game is to deal dope.

The marketing campaign calls the game a way to social network like people used to back in the day.
      
"My partner and I, Mike Genwright, decided that we would get back to the original social networking, where people actually have to deal with each other and talk with each other and get frustrated with each other and laugh with each other and just have fun with each other," said co-creator Rob Deeter.

The partners came up with the idea while in high school after playing a game called Dealer McDope.

"That's what started everything. And it was this board game where you buy on one side and sell on the other. And back then, at 18, 19 years old, we decided, man, we should do this for Colorado," said Deeter.

Still, the boys put off the game for a few decades.

"When the dawn of medical marijuana came to Colorado, we put our heads together and go, 'Now's the time. Let's get back on that idea we had about 20 years ago,'" Deeter said.

Deeter, a graphic artist, began coming up with different versions of the game a few years ago.

The cannabis game begins when you fly into Denver. The idea is to move through Colorado buying pot in eight different cities

"The goal is to collect marijuana from all eight cities, sell it in Denver, make a million dollars and get back to D.I.A. The first person to do that wins the game," said Deeter.
      
There is no word when the game will be made available to the general public.

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