One year later: Police still searching for missing Isabel Celis - New York News

One year later: Police still searching for missing Isabel Celis

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TUCSON, Ariz. -

Monday marks one year since a 6-year-old girl from Tucson went missing.

Officers, family members and volunteers have searched extensively for Isabel Celis, but have failed to find her.

Her family says they last saw her in her bedroom.

It began with a phone call one year ago Monday.

911 call: "I want to report a missing person. My little girl, she's 6 years-old, I believe she was abducted from our house."

It was followed by painful pleas from the 6-year-old's parents, Sergio and Becky.

"Mamas, you know how much mommy and daddy love you. We always tell you how much to we love you and you always say too much so just remember that we always will love you too much and just come home," said Becky Celis.

Isabel was last seen on a Friday night in April. Her father told police he tucked her in around 11 p.m., but by 8 a.m. the next morning she was gone.

Many have accused her father Sergio of foul play.

"I really don't know what to answer to that other than 'you're wrong'," said Sergio Celis.

"People accuse as much as they want, go for it, go right ahead. We are strong enough to take it and there's nothing that you're gonna find on us," said Becky Celis.

More than 150 law enforcement officers from the FBI and Sheriff's office searched the family home and surrounding desert.

Later, a volunteer hub was set up and manned by up to 12 people at a time, but people have stopped committing their time and the center recently shut down.

Sunday balloons were released and prayers were said, all in hopes that Isabel will someday be seen again.

The case is still active and open. Anyone with information is asked to call the police.

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