FCC wants to relax TV standards for nudity, profanity - New York News

FCC wants to relax TV standards for nudity, profanity

Updated:

By: Jamshid Ghazi Askar, WorldNow

"F-bombs” and some female frontal nudity could soon become kosher for primetime TV - but major media outlets have largely ignored that development during the couple of weeks that have transpired since the Federal Communications Commission announced it is considering relaxing the decency standards that govern nudity and profanity on broadcast television.

A Reuters wire story last week reported, “Regulators on (April 1) launched a review of policy governing the way it enforces broadcasts of nudity and profanity on radio and television. … The Federal Communications Commission issued a public notice inviting comment on whether it should focus its efforts on pursuing only the ‘most egregious' cases in which rules are broken, or focus on isolated cases of nudity and expletives uttered on radio and TV shows.”

While urging people to denounce the proposed changes via comments to the FCC, the American Family Association warned, “Specifically, if enacted, the new FCC policy would allow network television and local radio stations to air the f-word, the s-word and to allow programs to show frontal female nudity, even during hours when they know children will be watching and listening.”

Parents Television Council president Tim Winter said via press release, “The FCC's announcement (April 1) is deeply vexing. … It unnecessarily weakens a decency law that withstood a ferocious, 10-year constitutional attack waged by the broadcast industry. It invites yet another wave of special interest pressure to obviate the intent of Congress and the will of the American people. … On behalf of millions of families, the PTC firmly believes that the FCC should not limit indecency enforcement only to 'egregious' vs. isolated instances. The FCC is supposed to represent the interests of the American public, not the interests of the entertainment industry.”

In essence, “the decision was made as part of an effort to reduce an overwhelming backlog of complaints that had been building up since the Bush administration, when the FCC vowed to crack down on so-called fleeting expletives,” the International Business Times reported Wednesday.

The pertinent FCC public notice from April 1 states, “We now seek comment on whether the full Commission should make changes to its current broadcast indecency policies or maintain them as they are. For example, should the Commission treat isolated expletives in a manner consistent with our (prior) decision … ‘If a complaint focuses solely on the use of expletives, we believe that … deliberate and repetitive use in a patently offensive manner is a requisite to a finding of indecency.’”

Original post

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Skydiver dies after crashing into NJ backyard

    Skydiver dies after crashing into NJ backyard

    Monday, April 21 2014 10:23 AM EDT2014-04-21 14:23:02 GMT
    A 49-year-old sky diver from Brooklyn died after crashing into the backyard of a home in New Jersey. According to officials, Arkady Shenker wore a specialized parachute during the jump. Shenker was known to be an experienced skydiver who had more than 300 jumps under his belt.
    A 49-year-old sky diver from Brooklyn died after crashing into the backyard of a home in New Jersey. According to officials, Arkady Shenker wore a specialized parachute during the jump. Shenker was known to be an experienced skydiver who had more than 300 jumps under his belt.
  • Easter Bunny train sparks New Jersey brush fires

    Easter Bunny train sparks New Jersey brush fires

    Fire officials say several small brush fires were ignited by a train carrying the Easter Bunny in northwestern New Jersey.
    A train carrying the Easter Bunny in northwestern New Jersey has ignited several small brush fires.
  • Cops: 73-year-old man shoots neighbor in dispute

    Cops: 73-year-old man shoots neighbor in dispute

    Monday, April 21 2014 7:37 AM EDT2014-04-21 11:37:28 GMT
    A 73-year-old Connecticut man will be appearing before a state judge after being charged with shooting his neighbor three times during an argument on Easter morning.
    A 73-year-old Connecticut man will be appearing before a state judge after being charged with shooting his neighbor three times during an argument on Easter morning.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices