Atlanta para-athlete not celebrating Boston Marathon win - New York News

Atlanta para-athlete not celebrating Boston Marathon win

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ATLANTA -

A metro Atlanta para-athlete won the men's wheelchair quad event at the Boston Marathon on Monday, but he says it's not a time to celebrate.

Santiago Sanz wants to reach out to the victims of the terrorist bombings to let them know there is life after their heartbreaking injuries.

Sanz trains in Georgia three to four months out of the year. He's a multi-medaled athlete, who's broken numerous world records, but his latest achievement was overshadowed by the terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon.

"It was my 13th marathon and it was a victory. But I don't want to celebrate nothing because there's nothing to celebrate right now," Sanz said.

Santiago was in his hotel room at the time of the explosions, but he heard them and realizes how close he was to ground zero of the attack.

"Wow. It could have happened to me, or any of my friends right when I was crossing the line," Sanz said.

Sanz will start training in Snellville on Wednesday for the Kentucky Derby Festival half marathon later this month.He now thinks about how difficult it is to secure a racing event.

"How can you really have security measures in a 6-mile or in a 26-mile road, which is packed with people? I mean anybody can do whatever," Sanz said.

He won't let the threat of terrorism stop him from competing in races around the world and had a message for the runners who lost their limbs in Monday's explosions.

"They need to try to keep moving, and try to keep doing things just to be happy, you know, in their lives," Sanz said.

Sanz lost the use of his legs to a neurological disorder when he was a child. He plans on contacting the runners severely injured in the Boston Marathon attack to encourage them to keep competing.

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