The Talker: Growing number skipping TV for smartphones, tablets - New York News

The Talker: Growing number skipping TV for smartphones, tablets

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

Do you have cable, satellite, or an antenna? A lot of people are choosing not to have any of those.

In fact, a growing number of homes are rejecting the way America has always watched TV. Last year, 974,000 new households were created, but the cable and satellite companies added just 46,000 television customers. That's less than 5 percent.

The trend, especially for young people, is to get all viewing via the internet, through places like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and other online services.

"Zero TV" homes have become so common, the Nielsen ratings company has made them an official viewing group. Nielson says there are now 5 million "Zero TV" homes. 5 years ago, there were 2 million.

Cost is a big reason for the change. Cable or satellite is often around $100 a month for all the channels you want, while online services cost less than $10.

There's also an entire cultural shift at play. "Cord cutters" refers to people who ditch their landline phones, cable and satellite TV. Now, there's a group known as "cord nevers," which are people who have never had a landline phone or TV subscription.

Antennas are also making a comeback. One store, online of course, is on pace to sell 600,000 antennas this year, though, there are worries about how much more it can grow. The store says a lot of people nowadays don't even know you can get TV for free over-the-air. They say others don't care -- they're happy with Netflix.

TV stations, like FOX 32 News, have started to stream their shows live online. Some stations even send their broadcasts straight to mobile devices, though most phones need an add-on device to receive the signal.

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