Mother of man critically injured in pedicab crash wants changes - New York News

Mother of man critically injured in pedicab crash wants changes

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -

He was in the valley for the Fiesta Bowl back in January, but has been in a coma ever since, after the pedicab he was riding in was hit by a suspected drunk driver.

That crash has led the city of Scottsdale to push for some changes on all the pedicabs that flood their streets night after night. One supporter of the changes is the victim's mother.

The city of Scottsdale does not have laws that specifically regulate pedicabs. But that could soon change. And the victim's mother hopes it does, so nobody will have to go through what she and her family are going through.

Cody Clark has been in a coma for more than 3 months. He was in a pedicab when a drunk driver slammed into it the night of the Fiesta Bowl game. Cody was in town for the game from Kansas City. His sister was here too.

"He talked about how awesome it was here. He even told her he wanted to move here," says Sandy Clanton, Cody's mom.

Sandy flew out from Kansas City shortly after the accident.

"He is fighting, he is not giving up and we are not giving up on him. We have no idea what his outcome is going to be but we keep praying and we have faith."

The night of the accident, the pedicab operator was taking Cody and some friends back to their hotel on Scottsdale Road, about 2 miles from old town.

"I think that is crazy. I just couldn't believe it when I heard that they were 2 miles out on basically a highway."

The Scottsdale City Council hopes to change that. With this new ordinance, pedicab operators will not be able to take a pedicab on a street with a speed limit over 35 miles per hour, unless there is a bike lane.

The police chief would have authority to designate areas off-limits to pedicabs.

The vehicle would also have to have a certain amount of reflectors and lights that make them much more visible at night.

"They need to do something so nobody else has to go through this. So somebody else's family doesn't have to go through what we went through, 'cause it is horrible," says Clanton.

If the ordinance is passed, a pedicab operator who breaks the rules could be fined anywhere from $150 to $300 per violation. The council is set to vote Tuesday night.

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