Students stage 'empty holster' protest at Georgia Tech - New York News

Students stage 'empty holster' protest at Georgia Tech

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ATLANTA -

Some Atlanta college students wore empty gun holsters on Monday to protest gun restrictions on campus.

The Georgia Tech students hoped to convey a message as part of a week-long protest planned around the county.

We're conveying the fact that we're being disarmed by crossing the line on to campus," said Robert Eager of the Georgia Tech chapter of Students for Concealed Carry. "These are people who can carry everywhere else in the state of Georgia, who by coming here to Georgia Tech can no longer defend themselves."

Members of Students for Concealed Carry in Georgia were disappointed that the General Assembly did not pass a bill allowing licensed owners to carry guns in most areas of college campuses.

An 11th hour compromise deal would have allowed guns on campus, but only after eight hours of safety training for licensed gun owners ages 21-25. The agreement came too late for the bill to pass.

Many students have their doubts about campus carry legislation, saying security should be left to police.

"I think it would just cause more problems, and I would feel more unsafe, to have somebody who isn't as trained to be carrying a gun on campus. It doesn't seem logical to me," said Georgia Tech student Charlene Walton.

The state university system strongly opposed the bill.

"Too many opportunities, too many stresses that people will do the wrong thing with guns," Hank Huckaby, chancellor of the University System of Georgia, told FOX 5 on March 6.

But the Students for Concealed Carry think that they have a good chance of winning passage early in next year's legislative session.

"People have carried successfully at many universities across the country and we've seen them carry here on our campuses inside of their vehicles safely for over four years now," said Eager.

While guns are not allowed in campus classrooms or dorms, state law allows college students to store weapons in locked cars.

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