New Season: Over 28 Percent of MLB Players Are Foreign-Born - New York News

New Season: Over 28 Percent of MLB Players Are Foreign-Born

Posted: Updated:

(By: FOX News Latino) Twenty-eight percent of Major League Baseball players on the 25-man opening day rosters were born outside of the 50 United States, according to the commissioner's office.

It's the fourth-highest number in big leagues' history, trailing last season, 2007 and 2005. 

There were 241 players born outside the U.S., out of the 856 players on 30 big league rosters, the disabled list and restricted list.

The Dominican Republic, recent winner of the World Baseball Classic, was the best represented country with 89 players, including New York Yankees All-Star Robinson Cano. Venezuela was second with 63, which includes Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera, then Canada (17), Cuba (15) and Mexico (14).

Puerto Rico had 13 players, Japan had 11 and Colombia and Panama had four each. Australia, South Korea and Nicaragua each had two.

Milwaukee had the most foreign-born players with 14 and Texas was next at 13. Angels, Dodgers and Rangers -- have 11 foreign-born players apiece. The Dodgers have players from eight different countries and territories outside the United States: Canada, Curaçao, the Dominican Republic, Japan, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Taiwan and Venezuela.

Fox News Latino did the math and found out that 24.2 percent players on this year's MLB rosters are foreign-born players from Latin American countries. Only 4 percent of the league is Canadian, European or Asian.

Major League Baseball officials also told Fox News Latino that 27.1 percent of its players are of  "Hispanic background."

This includes players such as pitcher Sergio Romo of the San Francisco Giants and Adrian Gonzalez of the Los Angeles Dodgers, who are of Mexican descent but born in the United States and are not included on the foreign born list.

According to the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, last year's Latino percentage was 27.3 percent.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices