Volunteers pack meals for children in 3rd world countries - New York News

Volunteers pack meals for children in 3rd world countries

Posted: Updated:
PHOENIX -

Easter weekend isn't usually when you see a ton of folks volunteering – it happens more often around Thanksgiving and the Christmas holiday season.

But this year one group was asked to open their doors to allow families to volunteer on Good Friday.

People just wanted to help feed the starving children in 3rd world countries.

"So they don't have to worry about dying of hunger," explains 13-year-old Brian.

Brian is one of several kids there who volunteered their time. Kids as young as 5 years old helped pack 27,000 meals in 125 boxes.

"It's very exciting, competitive. You can hear us shouting when we finish our boxes, there's a lot of competition which is fun and it's great to be in groups, you can compete with one another at the tables," says Barbara Dykman-Thomas, volunteer.

"We're feeding a lot of kids around the world so it's critical," says Janine Skinner, development advisor of FMSC.org. "A lot of the food we pack here goes to the Philippines, Nicaragua, Honduras."

"We provide a pack of food that includes chicken, vegetables, soy and rice, both those in the bags. We seal the bags, the bags go in a box and then once we fill up the box we shout out that we finished the box and someone comes up and picks the box up for us," says Dykman-Thomas.

The 74 volunteers there Friday are helping feed 73 children for a year.

It's a thought that hits close to home.

"FMSC is a Christian organization but you don't have to be Christian to participate. But for those of us who are, it's especially meaningful this weekend when we're thinking about the sacrifices that Jesus made for us."

The families asked to volunteer and were looking forward to it. They offered to pay $50 each to buy the items necessary to pack.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • OCME: Police chokehold caused Eric Garner's death

    OCME: Police chokehold caused Eric Garner's death

    Friday, August 1 2014 7:19 PM EDT2014-08-01 23:19:02 GMT
    The New York City medical examiner ruled Friday that a police officer's chokehold caused the death of a man whose videotaped arrest and final pleas of "I can't breathe!" sparked outrage and led to the announcement of a complete overhaul of use-of-force training for the nation's largest police force.
    The New York City medical examiner ruled Friday that a police officer's chokehold caused the death of a man whose videotaped arrest and final pleas of "I can't breathe!" sparked outrage and led to the announcement of a complete overhaul of use-of-force training for the nation's largest police force.
  • 'Ice bucket challenge'

    NY man with ALS gets support from friends and strangers

    NY man with ALS gets support from friends and strangers

    Friday, August 1 2014 7:14 PM EDT2014-08-01 23:14:45 GMT
    When he was 31, Patrick Quinn, of Queens, received the life-changing news: he has ALS. It all started after a softball game in 2011. After two years of countless medical tests, the diagnosis was final. Since then, Quinn has watched his body change. His arms are much thinner. His biceps and triceps have atrophied. His hands have lost all muscle.
    When he was 31, Patrick Quinn, of Queens, received the life-changing news: he has ALS. It all started after a softball game in 2011. After two years of countless medical tests, the diagnosis was final. Since then, Quinn has watched his body change. His arms are much thinner. His biceps and triceps have atrophied. His hands have lost all muscle.
  • 'Get on Up' and James Brown's Harlem legacy

    'Get on Up' and James Brown's Harlem legacy

    Friday, August 1 2014 5:55 PM EDT2014-08-01 21:55:13 GMT
    "Get on Up" is in theaters now. The film chronicles the career of James Brown, who had a special connection to Harlem and New York. Billy Mitchell is the in-house historian at the historic Apollo Theater. He says the Apollo was a second home to Brown, as it was here where he became an international superstar who appealed to all. But Brown's NYC legacy stretches even further.
    "Get on Up" is in theaters now. The film chronicles the career of James Brown, who had a special connection to Harlem and New York. Billy Mitchell is the in-house historian at the historic Apollo Theater. He says the Apollo was a second home to Brown, as it was here where he became an international superstar who appealed to all. But Brown's NYC legacy stretches even further.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices