Let it Rip: Protesting the EM and right-to-work laws - New York News

Let it Rip: Protesting the EM and right-to-work laws

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(WJBK) -

It was a historic week for the City of Detroit and the State of Michigan.

Two unprecedented laws took effect Thursday, and protestors were riled up and digging in, planning for a long fight.

But despite their efforts, the EM and right-to-work took full effect Thursday, ushering in a new era full of hope and optimism for some, while others saw it as nothing less than a trampling of their rights.

Thursday night on Let it Rip, our panels, led by Huel Perkins, dove right into the heart of the issue.

We were joined by Greg Bowens, former press secretary for Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer, who now owns his own public relations firm. He helped repeal the emergency manager act last year, and says this new law is going down, too.

We also featured Andrew "Rocky" Raczkowski, a Republican who spent several years in the State House. He was here to defend the new EM and right-to-work laws.

Also with us Thursday night was Maurice Jenkins, an expert on labor and employment issues. He believes that right-to-work will create more jobs.

And, as always, we were joined by co-host and Fox 2 legal expert Charlie Langton.

In the second half of Thursday night's Let it Rip, we took a look at the ambitious new plan to transform Detroit. It looks like a winner, but we asked the question: "Does anybody lose?"

Joining us on that panel was Josh Linkner, CEO of Detroit Venture Partners, making his Let it Rip debut. We also had on another Let it Rip first-timer, Mark Denson. He's a manager with the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation.

Award-winning Fox 2 Reporter Alexis Wiley also joined that panel.

Click on the videos above to watch this special edition of "Let It Rip." Also let us know your thoughts by posting them in the "Comments" section below.

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