Caught on Tape: Mom, Grandmother Leave Baby Behind At Station - New York News

Caught on Tape: Mom, Grandmother Leave Baby Behind At SEPTA Station

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A surveillance camera captured a baby that was left outside of a turnstile Monday at the 60th Street Station. A surveillance camera captured a baby that was left outside of a turnstile Monday at the 60th Street Station.
West Philadelphia -

SEPTA officials say a "bad decision" by a young mother and her mom caused an 8-month-old baby to be left behind in a stroller sitting near the turnstiles at 60th Street Station.

Police say their plan to evade the train fare backfired badly. And it was all caught on tape.

"A mother and grandmother had mis-communicated who was taking the child and left the child behind," said Septa Police Chief Thomas Nestel.

SEPTA surveillance video shows the 15-year-old mother and her mom at the turnstiles Monday. The mom goes through with a day pass, then hands it back to the baby's grandmother. For some reason, both of them turn and leave, neither realizing they left the baby girl sitting right there.

"The grandmother thinks the mother is getting the baby," Nestel said. "The mother thinks the grandmother is getting the baby."

As the child sat in the stroller, SEPTA riders and a SEPTA cashier began to investigate. A SEPTA supervisor called police and safely took the child to the cashier's booth.

"The child was in good condition, was in a snow suit, there was food in the baby carriage," Nestel explained.

In the meantime, SEPTA says when the mom and grandmother met up moments later on the train near 56th Street, they became frantic and waved down police. Minutes later they were reunited with the child.

"It's very clear to us that this was an accident on their part, not an attempt to leave the baby behind," Nestel added.

SEPTA also conferred with the Department of Human Services.

"We felt and DHS felt, that there was no need to take custody of the child or to make an arrest," Nestel said.  

The child was okay. Nestle also says the women left their purses in the stroller with the baby, further proof that they didn't mean to leave the child.

SEPTA riders had some passionate reactions to the baby being left behind over a train fare.

"There's no way in the world you sit there and you forget you have a baby with you in a stroller," said one rider. "You didn't forget how to make it , you should never forget and leave the baby behind."

"Somebody's supposed to say you got her, I got her, you got her," another rider told FOX 29.

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