Google: Police requests for users` data on the rise - New York News

Google: Police requests for users` data on the rise

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

How private are the photos that you send via email and the searches you do on Google?

Whenever you hit the send button in your email inbox or upload a photo to the web, you are storing information about yourself that may not remain private.

"Information online is not as well protected as is information offline," Center for Democracy and Technology's Gregory Nojeim says.

In fact, government snooping is way up. Google says law enforcement's requests for users' data in criminal matters have more than doubled over the past three years.

"The government is seeking access to information like the contents of email, records about who you emailed and who emailed you, sometimes it seeks photographs that a person has stored online, Nojeim explains.

Brian Fitpatrick heads a team of engineers at Google Chicago. His team tracks the thousands of requests issued by local, state and federal governments and regularly releases a transparency report on how often authorities ask for user data. Google is the first internet company to provide this information to the public.

"We're interested again, in making sure we help law enforcement appropriate, but we also want to protect free speech as well as the privacy and security of our users," says Fitzpatrick.

Over Skype, Privacy Advocate Gregory Nojeim of the Center for Democracy & Technology said the uptick in prying should concern anyone who uses the internet.

"The numbers of inappropriate law enforcement, of requests of data law enforcement is not entitled to get, are also increasing," Nojeim explains.

And in most cases, governments have been gaining access to users' information without a search warrant.

An updated Google transparency report shows in the latter half of 2012, authorities issued 10,000 requests with a subpoena, while only 3,000 accompanied a search warrant.

Google and a group of privacy advocates have been working to get congress to update the nearly 3-decades-old electronics communications privacy act to provide the same privacy protection online as citizens get offline.

Just last week, the house held a hearing on the proposed legislation to strengthen privacy protections.

"With the dramatic changes we've seen since then, the statute no longer provides the privacy protection that users of these services reasonably expect," Google Legal Director Richard Salgado said at the hearing.

"Just as we require a warrant for the government to come into your home look through your file drawers, we think that exact same protection should be afforded for data you storing in internet service," Salgado says.

Bipartisan bills to strengthen email privacy were recently introduced in both the house and senate. The debate on that continues.

Google has successfully urged Twitter, LinkedIn, Drop Box and other internet companies to begin releasing their own transparency reports. Microsoft-owned Skype has yet to reveal whether law enforcement can eavesdrop on users' calls and Facebook isn't "transparent" either.

In many cases, users are not notified that their private information is given out.

For more information on Google's transparency report, click here.

How private are the photos that you send via email and the searches you do on Google?

 

Whenever you hit the send button in your email inbox or upload a photo to the web, you are storing information about yourself that may not remain private.

 

()

34:26 information online is not as well protected as is information off line

 

In fact, government snooping is way up. Google says law enforcement's requests for users' data in criminal matters have more than doubled over the past three years.

 

()

36:18 the govt is seeking access to info like contents of email, records who u emailed and who emailed you, sometimes seeks photos stored online

 

(google )

35:37 we're interested (again), in making sure we help law enforcement approrp but we also want to protect the privacy and secrutiy of our users

 

Brian Fitpatrick heads a team of engineers at Google Chicago.  His team tracks the thousands of requests issued by local, state and federal governments and regularly releases a transparency report on how often authorities ask for user data.  Google is the first internet company to provide this information to the public.

 

(google )

41:25 i think transparecny imp to shine light what govt doing around internet

 

Over Skype, Privacy Advocate Gregory Nojeim of the Center for Democracy & Technology said the uptick in prying should concern anyone who uses the internet.

 

( skype)

30:50 the numbers of inappropriate law enforcment, of requests of data law enforcement is not entitled to get, are also increasing.

 

And in most cases, governments have been gaining access to users' information without a search warrant

An updated Google transparency report shows in the latter half of 2012, authorities issued 10,000 requests with a subpoena, while only 3,000 accompanied a search warrant.

 

( skype)

31:58 a warrant is approved by judge and the law enforcement officials have to show very strong evidfence of crime before they'll approve the warrant

 

Google and a group of privacy advocates have been working to get congress to update the nearly 3-decades-old electronics communications privacy act to provide the same privacy protection online as citizens get offline.

 

Just last week, the House held a hearing on the proposed legislation to strengthen privacy protections.

 

(google hearing)

31:20 with the dramatic changes we've seen since then no longer provides, ...can reasonably expect"

 

40:08 just as govt requires govt  need warrant to look through drawers we think that same protection in internet service mail or photos ...absolutely

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Twitter, linked in... Not legally boudn to alert user

Google turned down ten percent of time... When overly broadskhype

Bipartisan bills to strengten email privacy were recently introduced in both the house and senate

Online privacy bill introduced

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