Is the gender pay gap a myth? - New York News

Is the gender pay gap a myth?

Updated:

By: Mercedes White

In her March 14 interview with Diane Rehm of NPR, Sheryl Sandberg discussed, among other things, the gender pay gap. Women, Sandberg said, are earning 77 cents compared to every dollar earned by men. Sandberg's figures are based on widely-cited data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2011 Current Population Survey.

However, some critics suggest that the Census Bureau's method for measuring the gendered pay gap is problematic. "The data is clear that for the same work men and women are paid roughly the same. The media need to look beyond the claims of feminist organizations," said Marty Nemko, radio show host and best-selling author, in an interview with CBS.

Nemko cites four major reasons men earn more than women, none of which he says involve gender discrimination. First, men are more likely to choose dangerous jobs, and dangerous jobs pay more. Second, men are more likely to work in higher-paying occupations such as computers or engineering. Third, they are more likely to work longer hours. Fourth, even within the same career categories, men are more likely to pursue high-stress, high-paying specialities than their female counter parts.

Nemko isn't the only critic of the so-called gender pay gap. In a 2011 article for the Wall Street Journal Carrie Lukas wrote, "Feminist hand-wringing about the wage gap relies on the assumption that the differences in average earnings stem from discrimination. Thus the mantra that women make only 77 percent of what men earn for equal work. But even a cursory review of the data proves this assumption false."

"However assuming that women have themselves to blame for the wage gap is an easy conclusion, because it doesn't ask us to think (about) the treatment of women in the workplace," wrote Bryce Covert in an article for The Atlantic. Her review of available literature suggests that "women show just as much enthusiasm for getting ahead as their male peers. Choices aren't the only thing holding back women's earnings. Bias is happening, too, even if it's uncomfortable to call it out."

Originally Posted

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Aire Ancient Baths

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    A relaxing bathhouse in busy Tribeca

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:29 PM EDT2014-07-30 02:29:51 GMT
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
    Deep beneath the hustle and bustle of Tribeca lies a modern-day oasis brimming with old world charm: Aire Ancient Baths, my new favorite city escape. The breathtaking spa is illuminated by hundreds of candles and smells of invigorating eucalyptus. For around $80 you can bathe in the tranquil blue pools for 90 minutes and find the temperature that's right for you.
  • NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    NYC stores with no signs feed curiosity

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 8:40 PM EDT2014-07-30 00:40:09 GMT
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
    From coffee shops in Brooklyn to restaurants in Manhattan, we find speakeasies standing out by blending in. When people in Bushwick want a green machine juice blend they visit Leticia Castillo's Owl Juice Pub. But first they must find the owl. "We been doing fine without a sign," Castillo says.
  • NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    NY brothers invent machine that makes CPR easier

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 6:40 PM EDT2014-07-29 22:40:57 GMT
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
    Only 10 percent of people who get CPR from a bystander actually survive. But two young men in Westchester County have now patented a device that could dramatically increase those odds and save lives. John and Chris DiCapua's sitting room in their parents' Westchester County home has had a unique guest lying around for quite a while now: a CPR dummy. What began as an idea from their time as Boy Scouts is now a device that could potentially save lives.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices